• Rihanna's luxury fashion brand will launch sooner than we thought
    Style
    Harper’s Bazaar

    Rihanna's luxury fashion brand will launch sooner than we thought

    The singer shares her debut campaign video for the LVMH label

  • Amelia Windsor's Extremely Cute Royal Wedding Guest Dress Is Available To Buy Right Now
    Style
    Elle

    Amelia Windsor's Extremely Cute Royal Wedding Guest Dress Is Available To Buy Right Now

    Puff sleeves? Check! Sweetheart neckline? Check! Our extreme jealousy? Check!

  • Duchess of Cambridge wears £8 earrings and high street dress in new family photos
    Style
    Alison Coldridge

    Duchess of Cambridge wears £8 earrings and high street dress in new family photos

    The royal style icon no doubt pleased fans in her latest high street look.

  • Supersized celebrity red carpet dresses
    Style
    Alison Coldridge

    Supersized celebrity red carpet dresses

    Supersized dresses seem to be having a moment. The red carpet at Cannes Film Festival 2019 is covered in frothy, attention-grabbing gowns, with stars including Indian film star Deepika Padukone and Thai A-lister Sririta Jensen posing for photos in outrageously over-sized creations.

  • Can we put an age limit on fashion when the ‘model of the year’ is only 17?
    Style
    The Independent

    Can we put an age limit on fashion when the ‘model of the year’ is only 17?

    At last, leading designers and publishers have agreed to stop using models under the age of 18 in editorials and on the catwalk. Francis Pinault, chief executive of the Kering Group which owns Gucci, Balenciaga, St Laurent and McQueen, made the commitment this week at a conference for the fashion industry in Copenhagen, along with the the Council of Fashion Designers of America. Kering is following Vogue publishers Conde Nast, which made a similar commitment last August. Yet in December Kaia Gerber, the daughter of former supermodel Cindy Crawford, was crowned "Model of the Year". She's just 17 and walked the catwalk in Stella McCartney’s show earlier this year. Enforcing any kind of ruling is bound to be difficult, and the fashion industry is notorious for breaking rules. How can luxury brands square their mission with "sustainability"? The fashion business is predicated on persuading us to shop even when our wardrobes are already full. Crown Princess Mary of Denmark was praised for wearing a "recycled" skirt from 2015 to the event, but she also turned up in a brand new McQueen blazer and an H&M dress – both companies were sponsors of the conference. Staying on message is difficult in planet fashion.

  • Spring showers: the stylish way to rain-proof your wardrobe
    Style
    Evening Standard

    Spring showers: the stylish way to rain-proof your wardrobe

    It's spring. The sun is shining, the birds are singing, there's not a cloud in th-oh wait, it's raining.

  • Cannes best dressed: From Brigitte Bardot to Madonna, iconic vintage looks from the film festival's history
    Style
    Evening Standard

    Cannes best dressed: From Brigitte Bardot to Madonna, iconic vintage looks from the film festival's history

    The 72nd Cannes Film Festival began on May 14, drawing the most promising stars of cinema from around the world. Beyond the films vying for a coveted Palm d'Or, the French festival is also renowned for its glamorous red carpet which has seen the likes of Elizabeth Taylor and Rihanna dazzle over the years. With the event dating back to 1946, the Cannes archives are a hive of glamorous movie star moments.

  • Fashion brand Oh Polly apologises after creating separate Instagram account for plus-size models
    Style
    The Independent

    Fashion brand Oh Polly apologises after creating separate Instagram account for plus-size models

    Online fashion brand Oh Polly has apologised after customers noticed it was running a separate Instagram account for plus-size models.The account, named Oh Polly Inclusive, has been criticised on social media by people including YouTuber Alissa Ashley, who described it as “segregation”.“What makes these women not suitable for your main page @ohpolly ? Ohpollyinclusive?? Who approved this?” she tweeted on Monday.“Like imagine calling yourselves inclusive and not wanting to post women that don’t fit your ‘aesthetic’ on your brand page lmao [sic].”Ashley’s tweet garnered more than 20,000 likes and thousands of responses from people concurring the the additional page was discriminatory.“This is such a bad move,” wrote one person, “why make an entire new page for brand inclusivity when you can you just be an all around inclusive brand on your main?”Another added: “Why does the other page say “Inclusive” on it? There should be just one page that has both. That’s what inclusive means doesn’t it?”> What in the segregation is this. What makes these women not suitable for your main page @ohpolly ? Ohpollyinclusive?? Who approved this? pic.twitter.com/2HXujEE9j9> > — Alissa Ashley (@alissa_ashleyy) > > May 13, 2019Several users took issue with the bio on the Oh Polly Inclusive page, which featured the phrase; “Zero % Tolerance, 100% inclusive”, which they said made little sense.“The phrase ‘zero percent tolerance’ literally means ‘we are not tolerant’ which seems like the opposite of being inclusive??” wrote one person. “What were they even trying to say?? I’m very confused???? Lmao [sic]”.> I don’t understand why they felt the need to create a whole separate page. If you’re that ‘woke’ on inclusivity, post it on the main page! Basically anyone dress size 12 and over isn’t worthy enough to go on the main IG???> > — SHQ 🌺 (@ShaquelleRaevon) > > May 14, 2019> This is soo bizarre!! @ohpolly @ohpollyhelp you could have just done without the page? If you truly wanted to be inclusive you would feature them on your main page?? It’s disgusting. People are soo focused on appearing to be inclusive that they miss the point> > — Jessica Thomas 💜 (@JessicaAtilola) > > May 13, 2019Oh Polly’s main Instagram account has more than two million followers. Oh Polly Inclusive, however, had just 3,600. It has now been removed and the brand has apologised for its “serious error of judgement”.> View this post on Instagram> > A post shared by OH POLLY (@ohpolly) on May 11, 2019 at 2:15am PDTSpeaking on BBC Newsbeat, a spokesperson for Oh Polly said: “We established a new page with the specific aim of allowing our customers to discuss a wider range of issues.“Improving diversity remains an absolute priority for us across all of our channels.“We promise to continue listening to everyone in the Oh Polly community and, most importantly, learn from this mistake.”

  • Gucci's £600 turban sparks cultural appropriation row
    Style
    Francesca Specter

    Gucci's £600 turban sparks cultural appropriation row

    "The Sikh turban is not a hot new accessory."

  • An expert explains why you shouldn't use Kylie Jenner's walnut face scrub
    Style
    Francesca Specter

    An expert explains why you shouldn't use Kylie Jenner's walnut face scrub

    Want the billionaire's flawless complexion? You should avoid this scrub, apparently.

  • Harry Styles, Alicia Keys and Tilda Swinton's celebrity hairstylist launches scalp skincare line
    Style
    Evening Standard

    Harry Styles, Alicia Keys and Tilda Swinton's celebrity hairstylist launches scalp skincare line

    After years of styling hair at fashion weeks across the globe and working on glam squads for celebrities like Alicia Keys, Tilda Swinton and Harry Styles, hairstylist Helen Reavey knows all there is to know about scalp care. Throughout her time as a celebrity hairstylist, she’s seen how styling products and hot tools can damage the hair and leave buildup behind on the scalp. Unfortunately, most people - especially celebrities - can’t cut out styling products completely to eliminate that buildup, so Reavey, with the help of her husband Colm Mackin, created a solution: Act + Acre.

  • Elton John's bespoke outfits go on display in Savile Row tailor Richard James
    Style
    Evening Standard

    Elton John's bespoke outfits go on display in Savile Row tailor Richard James

    Bespoke outfits made for Sir Elton John went on display today in Savile Row. The star has frequented the Richard James store in Mayfair for more than 20 years. To mark the worldwide release next week of biopic Rocketman, Sir Elton has lent five outfits back to the tailor for a one-off, month-long “fashion showcase”.

  • Travel in style this summer with these chic airport outfit ideas
    Style
    Evening Standard

    Travel in style this summer with these chic airport outfit ideas

    Although preparing for your summer holiday poses numerous conundrums before you've even zipped up your suitcase or tried to cram all your carry-on toiletries into one clear plastic bag, there is also the stress of what to wear to the airport. Elle Fanning touched down in a smart white two-set paired with a baby blue shirt and bright orange belt bag, while Izabel Goulart opted for a summer-ready statement floral design and Julianne Moore kept things simple in a monochrome ensemble. If you're someone who favours comfort over style when travelling Selena Gomez has found the perfect compromise.

  • Stella McCartney is teaming up with Google to tackle fashion’s sustainability problem
    Style
    Evening Standard

    Stella McCartney is teaming up with Google to tackle fashion’s sustainability problem

    It’s no secret the fashion industry has a big problem when it comes to sustainability: every year £140 million worth of clothing ends up in landfill according to WRAP UK. The champion of sustainable fashion is undoubtedly Stella McCartney, with the British designer spearheading the uses of recyclable fabrics, organic cotton and synthetic leathers. Announced today at the Copenhagen Fashion Summit, the pilot aims to empower brands by offering them greater insight on the impact of their supply chains.

  • Every product Selena Gomez wore at the Cannes Film Festival
    Style
    Harper’s Bazaar

    Every product Selena Gomez wore at the Cannes Film Festival

    Her make-up artist Hung Vanngo revealed a step-by-step guide to the glamorous look

  • Preen by Thornton Bregazzi is the V&A's next designer in residence
    Style
    Harper’s Bazaar

    Preen by Thornton Bregazzi is the V&A's next designer in residence

    The brand follows in the footsteps of Alexander McQueen, Erdem, Molly Goddard and more

  • Microneedling: What happened when I tried this scary sounding skin treatment
    Style
    The Independent

    Microneedling: What happened when I tried this scary sounding skin treatment

    My skincare regime is slapdash at the best of times (more slap than dash if truth be told): a bit of baby oil to take off my eye make-up and a slick of Nivea for the rest. I’m also fond of slathering on some night cream and hoping for an overnight miracle, as promised on the jar.So, I’m not good with facials. The last time I had one I had to suppress a case of the giggles. While monks chanted through a Bluetooth speaker, a face mask tightened on my skin and a beautician spoke to me in absurdly soft tones that I strained to hear, I struggled to relax. So when an email popped into my inbox about the latest facial trend of microneedling, I almost deleted it.But then I remembered that a friend of mine had the procedure done some time ago and her skin looked great, so I decided to go along and give it a go. What was the worst that could happen?Microneedling (collagen induction therapy) is a minimally invasive treatment that involves making tiny punctures in the skin with a series of fine needles. Apparently a “brilliant collagen stimulator” – the “micro-injuries” caused by the needles stimulate the body’s healing processes, producing lots of lovely collagen, not only during the process, but for some time after too. And it isn’t limited to the face, apparently able to help with stretch marks, scar tissue and the after-effects of acne. It’s billed as “safe and effective” on a range of skin types, including sensitive skin.With a birthday coming up, I read on. The treatment, they said, would be “comfortable” – the needles in a microneedling device are thinner than a strand of hair. If they were coming anywhere near me I certainly hoped so. A mention of numbing cream was reassuring.The next morning I booked my appointment at Regents Park Aesthetics, being careful to avoid Googling microneedling images.When I arrived at the clinic a week later I was met by Natasha, who was going to do the honours. She immediately put me at my ease, explaining each step of the procedure with calming clarity. And her own youthful, dewy complexion couldn’t help but inspire confidence.First, Natasha applied a topical local anaesthetic cream to my face, and I had to wait for about five minutes for it to take effect. It was all reassuringly clinical: next, she unwrapped the sterile microneedling pen, or “Collagen P.I.N.” (Percutaneous Induction Needling), as it’s apparently called.And so the treatment began. I’m pleased to report that it was completely underwhelming: I had imagined blood, tears and probably a bit of wailing, but it was fine. At best it was quite relaxing, at worst a bit like pins and needles on your face, which was a bit weird, but nothing more. The sensation round and over my nose was strange, but none of the procedure was in any way painful.All the while Natasha explained what she was doing, asking if I was OK or if I wanted her to stop, so I felt in control of the whole experience. She worked on my face for about an hour all in all, concentrating on "problem areas" (my whole face, I think) and as she microneedled away she applied the growth factor serum, which promotes collagen production.When it was all done, I looked in the mirror – and looking back at me was a red-faced person. Not bloodied and bruised, not 10 rounds with Anthony Joshua, as I’d feared, just red-faced. Natasha gave me some collagen cream for the next few days and gave me clear instructions about what I should and shouldn’t do over the coming days and weeks (“You haven’t got anything planned tonight, have you?”).The regime wasn’t too difficult to accommodate: no make-up for at least 48 hours; no face creams or serums containing retinol or highly concentrated acid-based products; use gentle skincare products with no active ingredients; and apply sunscreen with an SPF of 30+ when going out for at least the next two weeks.Natasha also told me what I could expect in terms of the aftermath of the treatment, how long the redness would last. My skin would start to flake, she warned. Going home was slightly comical: deciding to get the tube, I wrapped my scarf around my face and didn’t make eye contact with anyone. That evening, my partner said I looked like Sir Alex Ferguson – which I could only take as a compliment, knowing how highly he regards himI had thought that as the anaesthetic cream wore off, it might be painful but it wasn’t at all. The following day my skin was very red, but not sore - apart from when I applied the cream - which admittedly did sting. The worst part was when my skin started flaking, as Natasha had warned. It began about day three and really was unpleasant. My skin was patchy, dry and incredibly itchy. But it only really lasted for a day – I would say give yourself a weekend to get over it.Now three weeks on from the procedure, I would say my skin is looking better – not especially youthful, but somehow healthier. And there may be a slight improvement in my lines, but they were far from fine lines, so any improvement is good. Results vary from person to person, but most people report to seeing a positive change one to two weeks after the first treatment. One single full-face session at Regents Park Aesthetics costs £200 and a course of three costs £550. My experience was that one session wasn't enough, so for the full benefits the complete course of three is probably what you'd need, of course that will set you back a pretty penny, so perhaps starting with an acid peel could be the way to go.

  • Google and Stella McCartney team up to help reduce fashion's environmental footprint
    Style
    Harper’s Bazaar

    Google and Stella McCartney team up to help reduce fashion's environmental footprint

    The pilot scheme will compile data that will encourage fashion companies do better

  • Skimpy 'lucky cat' bra sold on ASOS called 'horrifying' and 'uncomfortable'
    Style
    Francesca Specter

    Skimpy 'lucky cat' bra sold on ASOS called 'horrifying' and 'uncomfortable'

    When is a bra not, in fact, a bra?

  • 36 Looks That Prove Holly Is the Queen of the Summer Dress
    Style
    Who What Wear

    36 Looks That Prove Holly Is the Queen of the Summer Dress

    New season inspo, sorted.