• The Pre-Raphaelites weren’t a bunch of bawdy, arrogant men – women were just omitted from the narrative
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    The Independent

    The Pre-Raphaelites weren’t a bunch of bawdy, arrogant men – women were just omitted from the narrative

    The Pre-Raphaelites get a bad rap. There is a deep-rooted (and incorrect) belief that the movement was dominated by bawdy, arrogant young men with a penchant for depicting women as victims. What’s more, in recent years, the concept of the muse has been steered towards something more negative; a title reserved for women that can often imply a certain passivity. A new exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in London aims to challenge this view, by celebrating the oft-omitted women of the Pre-Raphaelite movement, whether artists, poets, wives, models or, indeed, muses. Here, the curators view the muse as a catalyst whose personality shines through the art and challenges our interpretation of familiar narratives.The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, formed in 1848, was a trio of rebellious young men – William Holman Hunt, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and John Everett Millais – who had become disillusioned with what they perceived as a lack of natural beauty in art. They wanted to paint from life, and so enlisted a number of women – dressmakers, servants, sisters, mistresses – to model for them. They placed them in famous settings from literature or legend, and by so doing found a way to explore the most pressing social anxieties of the time: sex, death and disease. Not only did these women’s influence have an immeasurable influence on the Brotherhood’s output, but they produced their own work too – poetry, paintings and sketches – that is just as worthy of study as their male peers.

  • A new line in hypocrisy
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    The Independent

    A new line in hypocrisy

    IT WAS good to see old Jarvis Cocker stick his head above the parapet again this week, choosing to expand on his theory of cocaine socialism at the NME Premier Awards on Tuesday night. First formulated in a track of the same name for his latest album, This Is Hardcore, his argument is that champagne socialism has been superseded under New Labour by something far more pernicious. Cocaine socialism, then, is the politics of selfishness, and it is thus named after the overwhelming do-as-I-say-not-as-I-do self- absorption that is one of the most noticeable behavioural characteristics of someone on a cocaine high.Jarvis, of course, knows whereof he speaks, and has himself displayed some of the attitudes of the cocaine socialist - not least in the replacement of Sarah, his girlfriend through the bad times before fame came along, with the teenage actor and model Chloe Sevigny. In fact, his behaviour is entirely consistent with his new ideology. Bearing in mind the massive majority of the New Labour Government, it is to be assumed that we're all cocaine socialists now.

  • Uganda’s hardest mile: Racing to rescue an endangered generation
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    The Independent

    Uganda’s hardest mile: Racing to rescue an endangered generation

    As her feet shuffle beneath her desk, rasping on the smooth dusty floor of the classroom, Sylvia Owemana,13, a refugee from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), looks up to the shaft of light pouring in, raises her eyebrows and tutts. Her soft quiet voice washes over the desks and chairs, explaining how she had not heard from her parents and siblings for more than two years, the latest news from relatives suggesting that they had all been killed in recent violence in DRC. Sylvia now lives with her 81-year-old grandmother Yosephina, forced to work the plantations on nearby farms around the Kamwenge District, Western Uganda, to provide for them both.Uganda for years has shouldered the burden of conflict in neighbouring countries, hosting 1.2 million refugees; almost 800,000 South Sudanese, and arrivals from the DRC have been on the rise since the beginning of 2019 due to ongoing fighting. These large influxes place enormous strain on limited resources of the humanitarian system, in particular the provision of food assistance to the most vulnerable: children make up 62 per cent of the number, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), while a 2016 Uganda Demographic and Health Survey report found 29 per cent of children under five in Uganda are stunted due to chronic undernutrition, which has considerable impacts on health and learning outcomes.

  • The TV shows to watch this week: From Watchmen to Warrior Women with Lupita Nyong’o
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    The Independent

    The TV shows to watch this week: From Watchmen to Warrior Women with Lupita Nyong’o

    You may recall the disturbing and brilliantly rendered movie Watchmen from a few years ago, itself based on an equally cultish DC Comics strip from the 1980s. It was an ingenious, enthralling mix of the usual superheroes stuff (superpowers, super-warped personalities, super-nonsenses), some wonderful re-invention of history plus a vision of the future – America in the fourth term of a Richard Nixon presidency, evolving into an authoritarian proto-fascistic state. Yes, it does sound familiar, doesn’t it?Sky Atlantic screens a promising HBO-produced variation on the Watchmen theme, easily reconciled to the various originals, which smartly plants it in an “alternative present”, which you might think is beyond sci-fi treatment and parody, but we still have some way to go before all norms of civilised political life have been trashed. There’s a prologue set in the 1920s, before we are catapulted a century on, to a word of vigilantism, secret societies and raining squid, apparently.

  • Books of the month: From Philip Pullman's The Secret Commonwealth to Adam Kay's Twas The Nightshift Before Christmas
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    The Independent

    Books of the month: From Philip Pullman's The Secret Commonwealth to Adam Kay's Twas The Nightshift Before Christmas

    Roberta, a character in Zadie Smith’s captivating new collection of short stories, says she knew Debbie Harry back in the old New York East Village days. "Whatever happens to old punks?" she muses. "Enquiring minds want to know.” Well, they go on to publish their life stories. Harry, the iconic figurehead of Blondie, tells her tumultuous tale in Face It.Harry’s book attempts to look at what it is to understand yourself, to grow up and make sense of a confusing world, a quest that is also apparent in the new autobiography from comedian Lenny Henry and in the fictional journey of Lyra Belacqua, the central character in Philip Pullman’s latest novel The Secret Commonwealth.

  • Animal magnetism: Stunning Steve McCurry photos show the complex relationship between humans and animals
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    The Independent

    Animal magnetism: Stunning Steve McCurry photos show the complex relationship between humans and animals

    Steve McCurry has been one of the most respected names in contemporary photography for more than forty years.Animals discovers a different side to the photographer who skilfully explores their complex relationship with humans and the environment.

  • Dhaka: where a literary festival can still make a difference
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    The Independent

    Dhaka: where a literary festival can still make a difference

    What's the point of a literary festival? Should they be cosy, self-congratulatory affairs, in which writers trot out platitudes and arguments with which the audience already agree? Or should they aim to challenge orthodoxy, even when it risks trouble?It sounds obvious, but even in this contentious political moment, festivals in the UK are not unpredictable. Formulae are followed. Big names will trot out a few spicy opinions about politics, unrelated to their books but in the hope of selling more copies of them. On one or two panel debates there will be bursts of mild crossfire, and afterwards the combatants will drink champagne together at the sponsors' expense. However much they might protest otherwise, there is not much at stake. Brexit or no, Britain is lucky that its core freedoms of speech, thought and assembly remain unassailable.

  • Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019: Startled marmot staring death in the face wins prestigious international award
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    The Independent

    Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019: Startled marmot staring death in the face wins prestigious international award

    An extraordinary image of a standoff between a Tibetan fox and a marmot snapped up the top award at this year’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition.Beating over 48,000 entries from 100 countries, Yongqing Bao, from China, produced a powerful frame of both humour and horror in one perfect picture.

  • Gina Rodriguez apologises for saying the n-word during Instagram video
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    The Independent

    Gina Rodriguez apologises for saying the n-word during Instagram video

    Actor Gina Rodriguez has apologised for posting a video of herself using the N-word on social media.The star of Netflix show Jane The Virgin filmed herself singing along to a Lauryn Hill rap from “Ready Or Not” by the Fugees.

  • Elton John review, Me: ‘Rocket Man’ star’s autobiography is full of warmth and candour
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    The Independent

    Elton John review, Me: ‘Rocket Man’ star’s autobiography is full of warmth and candour

    Elton John is not an artist known for being shy about his personal life. Even so, the candour with which he speaks in his first – and apparently only – autobiography, Me, is astounding.From the off, the "Rocket Man" star plunges into accounts of depression (there are multiple recollections of suicide attempts), drug addiction, break-ups and his prostate cancer diagnosis, but never appeals to the reader for sympathy. His voice, assisted by music critic Alexis Petredis (who worked on the book with John for three-and-a-half years) is warm and genial.

  • 5 astonishing facts about your own body from Bill Bryson’s new book
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    The Independent

    5 astonishing facts about your own body from Bill Bryson’s new book

    Bill Bryson first shambled onto our shores from his native US in 1973, an instinctive anglophile. Since then he has turned a kindly and satirical eye on everything from the rationing of hot baths in coastal B&Bs; (Notes from a Small Island, 1995) to the elusive genius of Shakespeare (2007) and the fiery birth of the planet Earth (A Short History of Nearly Everything, 2003).Having graduated from genial travel writing to popular science, Bill Bryson wields a childlike determination to keep asking questions until he understands something well enough to explain it. How do you weigh the Earth? How does a human blood cell work? Why can’t we live forever?

  • The TV shows to watch this week: From Dublin Murders to The Name of the Rose
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    The Independent

    The TV shows to watch this week: From Dublin Murders to The Name of the Rose

    Dublin Murders looks to be a worthy contender for viewers’ attention as the nights draw in. This new crime drama – murder mystery of course – is designed to draw you in and keep you there for an ambitious eight-week run.Well, over the years we’ve had detectives looking into grisly murders everywhere from Oxford to San Francisco, from Shetland to Sicily, from Oslo to Guadeloupe, so why not Dublin? There are some reliable contours to the story – male-female pairing of cops, Cassie and Rob (played by Sarah Greene and Killian Scott), each with troubled lives and a complicated professional relationship; a ritualistic murder of a young girl in the woods (they are almost always young girls, aren’t they?), her body laid out in theatrical fashion upon a sacrificial stone; and not much to go on.

  • Pointes of view: Breathtaking pictures of ballerinas across the world
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    The Independent

    Pointes of view: Breathtaking pictures of ballerinas across the world

    In 1994 Dane Shitagi, a young photographer from Oahu, Hawaii, pushed a small platform into the pool at the bottom of a local waterfall.Claire Unabia James, a ballerina, perched on top of the platform, sometimes wobbling and falling off into the cold water, while Shitagi photographed her from the shore.

  • 15 best books of 2019 to read now
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    The Independent

    15 best books of 2019 to read now

    This year has been a bumper year for novels so there’s plenty of choice.Whether you like gripping page-turners or literary novels that give you something to discuss over the dinner table, there’s something for everyone.

  • London East Asia Film Festival 2019: 10 unmissable movies from this year’s programme
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    The Independent

    London East Asia Film Festival 2019: 10 unmissable movies from this year’s programme

    Focusing on crisis, chaos and survival, this year’s London East Asia Film Festival is showcasing disaster comedies, psychological MeToo thrillers and some of the most over-the-top exciting action the world loves from East Asian cinema. This year also welcomes back a special collection focusing on women’s stories, showcasing many faceted tales across Taiwan, Hong Kong and China.With such a huge programme to choose from, here is a highlight of 10 films from this year’s festival that you might want to go and see.

  • Loving Lovecraft: How an obscure 1920s author became the world’s favourite horror writer
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    The Independent

    Loving Lovecraft: How an obscure 1920s author became the world’s favourite horror writer

    Swan Point Cemetery in Providence, Rhode Island, is the most appropriate location in the world at which to suffer an onslaught of existential horror. Not that this was any comfort as I arrived there one summer, my more-than-slightly unenthusiastic girlfriend in tow, only to be confronted by rows of headstones bristling into the horizon. We had come for one grave in particular. But how to find it amid this riot of marble and faded lettering?Our dreaded sunny day at the cemetery gates had already involved a winding drive from central Providence past the Rhode Island School of Design, where the future members of Talking Heads had met in the mid-Seventies (and where Seth MacFarlane created Family Guy).

  • 30 artworks to see before you die, from Mona Lisa to The Great Wave
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    The Independent

    30 artworks to see before you die, from Mona Lisa to The Great Wave

    What makes a great painting? Is it one that makes you wonder how on earth the artist reproduced a scene so precisely in paint? Or ones that capture emotion in a single brushstroke? Or simply something utterly beautiful?Art lovers can amble around Paris’s the Louvre, New York’s Moma, Madrid’s Prado, Florence’s Uffizi Gallery and London’s Tate Gallery – even Venice’s Sistine Chapel, looking at walls (and ceilings) full of art.

  • ‘Highway 61’: Jessica Lange’s new photography book explores her midwestern roots
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    The Independent

    ‘Highway 61’: Jessica Lange’s new photography book explores her midwestern roots

    When Jessica Lange finally admits that her driving is a bit unpredictable it comes as a relief. I was afraid to bring it up from the passenger seat. “My kids used to say, ‘Mom, pick a lane!’” the two-time Oscar winner says, chuckling.On a day with silvery light coming through clouds and Lake Superior to our right, she is piloting us northward from Duluth, on Highway 61. We have a perfect car for an August road trip: her green 1967 Mercedes-Benz 250S, heavy as a tank and with seat belts of questionable functionality. But Lange exudes confidence and so I don’t worry too much. She knows where she is going.

  • Zanzibar’s traditional healers: How alternative medicine is growing in Tanzania
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    The Independent

    Zanzibar’s traditional healers: How alternative medicine is growing in Tanzania

    Zanzibar’s traditional healers, with their toolkits of herbs, holy scriptures and massages are being registered by authorities keen to regulate the practitioners who treat everything from depression to hernias.About 340 healers have been registered since Zanzibar, a region of Tanzania, passed the Traditional and Alternative Medicine Act in 2009. An estimated 2,000 more healers, or mgangas, are hoping to register, says Hassan Combo, the government registrar at the council that records them.

  • US cinema cancels Joker screenings after ‘credible’ threat
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    The Independent

    US cinema cancels Joker screenings after ‘credible’ threat

    A cinema in California has cancelled screenings of the Joker following a “credible” threat, police in the state said.The film, starring Joaquin Phoenix as Batman's sadistic nemesis, has proved controversial for its portrayal of violence and there have been heightened security fears surrounding its release.

  • The TV shows to watch this week: From Motherland to Ian Hislop’s Fake News Story
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    The Independent

    The TV shows to watch this week: From Motherland to Ian Hislop’s Fake News Story

    The great irony about Motherland, back for its third series, is that the very busy mums featured in the show wouldn’t actually have the time to watch a satirical sitcom about very busy mums.

  • An intimate portrait of America’s midwestern heartlands
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    The Independent

    An intimate portrait of America’s midwestern heartlands

    In 2004, photographer Gregory Halpern was living in San Francisco, fresh out of graduate school, barely employed and seriously uninspired. He applied to a number of artist residencies, and one place accepted him – the Bemis Centre for Contemporary Arts in Omaha, Nebraska.Although it’s the most populous city in the state, Omaha feels remote and typically midwestern. Aside from billionaire Warren Buffet, who was born in the city and has attracted a number of Fortune 500 companies to settle there, the city’s claims to fame are mostly practical and unglamorous – Omaha is the home of TV dinners and raisin bran.

  • Banksy painting depicting MPs as chimpanzees sells for record £9.9m at auction
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    The Independent

    Banksy painting depicting MPs as chimpanzees sells for record £9.9m at auction

    A Banksy painting depicting chimpanzees sitting in parliament has sold for more than £9 million at auction, breaking the record price for a work by the elusive British street artist.“Devolved Parliament”, in which chimpanzees replace politicians in the House of Commons, comfortably surpassed its estimated price tag of £1.5m to £2m, with the auctioneer declaring “history being made” at one point during the sale which was streamed live.

  • National Poetry Day 2019: 28 of the most powerful lines ever written
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    The Independent

    National Poetry Day 2019: 28 of the most powerful lines ever written

    On National Poetry Day, falling on 3 October, we recognise the moving spirit of poetry and its transformative effect on culture. Each year there’s a different theme and in 2019 the theme is “Truth”.Here are a small collection of singular lines, stanzas, and notions possessing the power to spring the most moving of thoughts and feelings into the humming imagination of the reader.

  • Hundreds of vintage motorcyclists ride though London in charity fundraiser
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    The Independent

    Hundreds of vintage motorcyclists ride though London in charity fundraiser

    From Panama to Paris, over 125,000 men and women donned their smartest vintage attire and hopped on their classic motorcycles to take part in the annual Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride, a fundraiser for prostate cancer research and men’s mental health initiatives.Some 10,000 riders are taking to the streets across the UK, braving the rain to take to the streets of cities including Oxford, Bristol and Manchester. In London, some wore goggles, brogues and tweet suits.