• Late in the Day by Tessa Hadley review: A nuanced account of how social class can be both a prison and an escape
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    The Independent

    Late in the Day by Tessa Hadley review: A nuanced account of how social class can be both a prison and an escape

    Tessa Hadley’s compelling new novel, Late in the Day, is a subtle, delicate evocation of modern life. Christine abandons her PhD to become a painter, while Alex, conversely, stops writing his promising poetry and becomes a primary school teacher.

  • 30 best children’s books: From Artemis Fowl to Peter Rabbit
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    The Independent

    30 best children’s books: From Artemis Fowl to Peter Rabbit

    Big friendly giants, honey-loving bears, hungry caterpillars, iron men: these figures populate the vivid imaginary landscapes of our childhoods. Like totems, we pass them on to our own children, each book a spell in itself.

  • The TV shows you need to watch this week: From Top Gear to EastEnders
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    The Independent

    The TV shows you need to watch this week: From Top Gear to EastEnders

    Not the Grand Tour, which is what Top Gear used to be. Actually Top Gear is still what it used to be, so it is more or less what the Grand Tour now is, which is to say not much to do with real motoring journalism.

  • The most incredible pictures of Earth: International Landscape Photographer of the Year
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    The Independent

    The most incredible pictures of Earth: International Landscape Photographer of the Year

    Braving the harshest climates and most gruelling terrains, some photographers will go to the ends of the Earth for the perfect shot. The winning photographers have captured some of the Earth's most incredible natural features, from mesmerising mountains to breathtaking woodlands. Winner of the top prize was Canadian Adam Gibbs, who has been a professional photographer for nearly 30 years.

  • 10 best baking books
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    The Independent

    10 best baking books

    From series three (Bake Off’s pinnacle, in our opinion) winner John Whaite, this book covers both humble, homely food, such as Marmite and cheddar loaf, and the more complex – try the orange and cardamom opera cake – with a sense of humour and warmth that makes it all feel achievable. From Yotam Ottolenghi and pastry chef Helen Goh, Sweet is full of beautiful sugar artistry and long, detailed recipes.

  • Wildlife photographer of the year: Nuzzling lions take pride of place in international competition
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    The Independent

    Wildlife photographer of the year: Nuzzling lions take pride of place in international competition

    An image of a tender moment between two lions is the winner of the Wildlife Photographer of the Year LUMIX People's Choice Award 2018. David Lloyd's photo depicting two male lions, thought to be brothers, nuzzling together has taken the top spot in a contest of 25 nature images with 16,000 people voting for their favourite. The shortlist was wittled down from over 45,000 photos by the Natural History Musuem, who are exhibiting the final 25 until June 30.

  • 40 books to read before you die, from Wuthering Heights to Dune
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    The Independent

    40 books to read before you die, from Wuthering Heights to Dune

    Job satisfaction comes and goes, partners enrapture and abscond, but you can always fall back on the timeless ability of literature to transport you to a different world. From Jane Austen’s mannered drawing rooms to the airless tower blocks of 1984, novels do something unique.

  • The TV shows you need to watch this week: From Endeavour to David Bowie
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    The Independent

    The TV shows you need to watch this week: From Endeavour to David Bowie

    Sunday evening will see the battle of zodiacs as ITV’s new series of Endeavour goes up against BBC offering Call the Midwife. Ford Zodiacs, that is, because, set in roughly the same rose-tinted era of the 1960s, we may well see DCU Fred Thursday in his black Ford Zodiac with police markings, simultaneously broadcast with Dr Patrick Turner driving his blue Ford Zodiac estate. Endeavour, by the way, an Inspector Morse prequel, is now in its sixth series, and the look and feel is authentically Morsian, as is Shaun Evans’ portrayal of young sergeant Endeavour Morse.

  • Albert Finney remembered: The working-class hero who inhabited every role he played
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    The Independent

    Albert Finney remembered: The working-class hero who inhabited every role he played

    Albert Finney was the actor’s actor. Finney later recalled the moment with characteristic, caustic wit, and at the same time gave an insight into what was to become a recurring story of wondrous understudy performances. Many other performances became etched on the theatregoers’ collective memory.

  • Albert Finney death: Veteran British actor who starred in Scrooge and Annie dies, aged 82
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    The Independent

    Albert Finney death: Veteran British actor who starred in Scrooge and Annie dies, aged 82

    Oscar nominated British actor Albert Finney – best known for his roles in Annie, Murder on the Orient Express and Scrooge – has died following a short illness at the age of 82, his family has announced. A statement from his family reads: “Albert Finney, aged 82, passed away peacefully after a short illness with those closest to him by his side. Finney, who was born in Salford in 1936, was one of Britain’s premiere Shakespearean actors and was nominated for five Oscars across almost four decades – for Tom Jones (1963), Murder on the Orient Express (1974), The Dresser (1983), Under the Volcano (1984) and Erin Brockovich (2000).

  • Kristen Roupenian on sex, power and viral fame: ‘Our emotions are outsized – someone doesn’t return a text and you want to murder everyone’
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    The Independent

    Kristen Roupenian on sex, power and viral fame: ‘Our emotions are outsized – someone doesn’t return a text and you want to murder everyone’

    Kristen Roupenian’s “Cat Person” was published by The New Yorker on Monday 4 December and by that Friday, it was the most-read piece of fiction of all time on the magazine’s website. It earned its author – who was then completing a writing fellowship in Ann Arbor, Michigan – global fame, quickly followed by a seven-figure, two-book deal.

  • 'So much of the queer experience is spent spinning': Read an exclusive extract from Crystal Rasmussen's Diary of a Drag Queen
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    The Independent

    'So much of the queer experience is spent spinning': Read an exclusive extract from Crystal Rasmussen's Diary of a Drag Queen

    There are few things that make a queen twirl like vintage Madonna. For some queens (and also some queers, femmes, butches, bull dykes, trans women, transvestites, faggots, trans men, asexuals, leather daddies, fisting pigs, campy twinks, aromantics, bisexuals and radical faeries) their tonic might not be a Madonna: it could be a Judy, or a Lady Gaga, a George Michael or a Beyoncé, The Cure, or a niche riot grrrl group who should be way more famous than they are, or Lou Reed or Alaska Thunderfuck. Generally it’s all Madonna, but right now it’s "Ray of Light", to which I’ve just finished spinning around in thigh-high silver lamé boots that chafe my thighs to within an inch of the bone.

  • Eric Hobsbawm: A Life in History by Richard J Evans review: A fair biography, despite some indulgences
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    The Independent

    Eric Hobsbawm: A Life in History by Richard J Evans review: A fair biography, despite some indulgences

    A colleague familiar with Eric Hobsbawm summed him up pretty much in two words. It’s a widely held opinion that this intellectually brilliant titan of the left, the most widely published historian in the world and pioneer of economic and social history, was in fact just a tankie: an unrepentant Stalinist who rationalised totalitarianism and political mass murder with some teleological cobblers gleaned from Marx. Not by Richard J Evans, though, another distinguished historian, who has written what looks to be the official biography, though it’s not called as much.

  • Moving past the jokes: Lorena Bobbitt hopes documentary will shed light on domestic violence
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    The Independent

    Moving past the jokes: Lorena Bobbitt hopes documentary will shed light on domestic violence

    Lorena is very matter-of-fact about the whole thing. There, she says as she drives us around in her Kia on a recent afternoon, is the hospital where surgeons reattached John Wayne Bobbitt’s penis after she cut it off with a kitchen knife as he slept on the night of 23 June 1993. “I’m not a vindictive person because I told them where it was,” Lorena Gallo, as she is now known, says.

  • Adèle by Leila Slimani review: This dazzling novel refuses to judge a woman’s compulsive sexual desires
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    The Independent

    Adèle by Leila Slimani review: This dazzling novel refuses to judge a woman’s compulsive sexual desires

    Halfway through Leïla Slimani’s Adèle, I realised that although it was dazzling me, it was also making me feel extremely depressed. It is quite something to be reading about a woman whose coping mechanisms involve seeking violent sexual release with strange men in dangerous situations while realising one’s own coping mechanisms are simply eBay and porridge. Adèle is a brilliant and bothersome book.

  • Bryan Singer: Bafta suspends 'Bohemian Rhapsody' director's nomination after sexual assault claims
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    The Independent

    Bryan Singer: Bafta suspends 'Bohemian Rhapsody' director's nomination after sexual assault claims

    Bryan Singer, the director of “Bohemian Rhapsody”, has been removed from the film’s Bafta Awards nomination list amid allegations he sexually abused underaged boys years ago. The academy announced on Wednesday that Singer’s nomination has been officially “suspended” after the allegations, which were detailed in an article published by The Atlantic that featured interviews from four men who said they had not spoken about the incidents previously. The 2019 Bafta Film Awards are scheduled to take place on 10 February in London’s Royal Albert Hall.

  • Oscars: How the hosting gig became a poisoned chalice
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    The Independent

    Oscars: How the hosting gig became a poisoned chalice

    When Anne Hathaway was first approached to host the Oscars in 2011, she turned the offer down, convinced that it was a “no-win situation”. It was James Franco, her eventual co-host, who changed her mind. “He didn’t give me anything,” Hathaway told People magazine recently.

  • David Bowie and Bob Marley top list of most anticipated music biopics
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    The Independent

    David Bowie and Bob Marley top list of most anticipated music biopics

    Film fans want to see movies based on the lives of David Bowie, Bob Marley and Frank Sinatra, according to a survey. After the success of 2018’s Bohemian Rhapsody, based on rock group Queen, researchers polled the British public to find out what other musical stories they would like to see on the silver screen. Other dream rock star biopics which appeared in the top 10 wish-list included those of Kurt Cobain, Madonna and Stevie Wonder.

  • Liam Neeson: Full transcript of Good Morning America interview addressing racism scandal
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    The Independent

    Liam Neeson: Full transcript of Good Morning America interview addressing racism scandal

    Liam Neeson has spoken about comments he made to The Independent where he said he roamed the streets with a cosh, wanting to kill a “black bastard” after someone close to him was raped. Today, he spoke to Good Morning America's Robin Roberts in an attempt to explain the comments which were met with international outrage.

  • Call the Midwife creator reveals when the show will 'probably' have to end
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    The Independent

    Call the Midwife creator reveals when the show will 'probably' have to end

    Call the Midwife’s creator Heidi Thomas has revealed when she expects the show to end. The BBC drama is currently in its eighth series, with new episodes taking place in 1964, as Poplar sees growing prosperity, increased immigration, and medical innovations. “I do know that the original nuns on whom the original books were based left Poplar in 1976, because the social and the medical climate had changed,” Thomas told the Radio Times.

  • M6nths film invites audience to see world through a pig's eyes
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    The Independent

    M6nths film invites audience to see world through a pig's eyes

    A short film shot entirely from a pig’s point of view has been released to mark the start of the Chinese Year of the Pig.

  • Liam Neeson interview: Listen to audio of actor recounting wanting to kill a 'black bastard' for raping someone close to him
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    The Independent

    Liam Neeson interview: Listen to audio of actor recounting wanting to kill a 'black bastard' for raping someone close to him

    Liam Neeson told The Independent how he once walked the streets with a cosh looking to kill a "black bastard" after a woman who was close to him was raped many years ago. “I went up and down areas with a cosh, hoping I’d be approached by somebody. The 66-year-old actor shared the previously undisclosed story during a press junket for his new film, Cold Pursuit, admitting that he is now “ashamed” of his past “awful” behaviour.

  • When graffiti becomes commercialised, who should pay for it?
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    The Independent

    When graffiti becomes commercialised, who should pay for it?

    When a mural by artist Banksy appeared on a garage wall in Port Talbot, the building’s owner, Ian Lewis, had no idea just how many people would want to get a good look at it.

  • More than just a miniskirt: Two exhibitions reveal how Mary Quant shaped our world
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    The Independent

    More than just a miniskirt: Two exhibitions reveal how Mary Quant shaped our world

    If you’re a British woman, you’ve probably got Mary Quant in your wardrobe. OK, maybe not literally – but if there’s a sleeveless shift or a tunic dress, a Peter Pan collar or a skinny-rib sweater, a pair of brightly coloured tights or even a PVC raincoat, you’re wearing Quant. And that’s before mentioning her most famous creation: the miniskirt.

  • Jussie Smollett breaks silence after 'racist and homophobic' Chicago attack
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    The Independent

    Jussie Smollett breaks silence after 'racist and homophobic' Chicago attack

    Actor Jussie Smollett has told fans that he is feeling “OK” and working with police after he was assaulted in Chicago this week in what has been described as a potential hate crime. Smollett left the scene and took himself to a hospital, where he was treated but said to be in good condition.