• I’m a Celebrity 2018: Everything we know so far about the new series
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    The Independent

    I’m a Celebrity 2018: Everything we know so far about the new series

    Ant McPartlin’s absence for the first time since 2002 means Dec will be joined by a new partner for what promises to be as surreal a gathering of bug-eating, safari-suited oddballs as ever. Always run late in the year, the latest instalment of I’m a Celebrity... will commence on ITV on Sunday 19 November 2018. Who is hosting in place of Ant McPartlin?

  • From Europe, with love: The collective spreading cheer to Brexit-weary Brits
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    The Independent

    From Europe, with love: The collective spreading cheer to Brexit-weary Brits

    As Britain prepares to leave the EU, two Bristol-based artists have left hundreds of love songs blaring out across the continent. For the past six months, Gemma Paintin and James Stenhouse – collectively known as Action Hero – have been driving around Europe, recording love songs en route. Since setting off from Bristol in April, the couple have covered around 32,000km in an adapted camper van that doubles as a recording studio, and have captured more than 600 love songs.

  • From Da Vinci to Degas: How famous artists were affected by their eyesight
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    The Independent

    From Da Vinci to Degas: How famous artists were affected by their eyesight

    Was Leonardo Da Vinci’s genius helped by a vision disorder? Da Vinci is believed to have suffered from a type called intermittent exotropia, a condition which causes one or both eyes to turn outward and affects around one in 200 people. Researchers have suggested that the disorder may have helped him because it would have given him the ability to switch to monocular vision, in which both eyes are used separately, and allowed him to focus on close-up flat surfaces.

  • Françoise Gilot: How Picasso's former muse became a force of her own in the art world
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    The Independent

    Françoise Gilot: How Picasso's former muse became a force of her own in the art world

    The 96-year-old French painter and author Françoise Gilot – famously known as the former lover and muse to Pablo Picasso, and the mother of two of his children, Claude and Paloma – published a book of sketches last month that she completed during her travels to India, Senegal and Venice between 1974 and 1981. This philosophical approach is unmistakable in the new monograph (published by Taschen) Françoise Gilot: Three Travel Sketchbooks, which includes drawings and watercolours that bear little stylistic resemblance to her public work. While the legacy of her relationship with Picasso has endured as an undeniable presence in her life (Paloma Picasso calls it a “nuisance” to her mother), Gilot has worked hard to maintain her autonomous presence in the art world.

  • Who is Banksy? The suspects linked to the art world’s biggest mystery
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    The Independent

    Who is Banksy? The suspects linked to the art world’s biggest mystery

    Banksy’s latest stunt has again excited interest in unmasking the art world’s most mysterious figure. The prime suspect has long been Robert Del Naja, also known as 3D, a founding member of trip hop band Massive Attack. Banksy’s street art first appeared in Bristol, where Del Naja hails from, his career beginning as a freehand graffiti artist with the DryBreadZ Crew before he joined The Wild Bunch in the early 1990s.

  • Company review, Gielgud Theatre, London: Broadway legend Patti LuPone steals show in modern version of groundbreaking Sondheim musical
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    The Independent

    Company review, Gielgud Theatre, London: Broadway legend Patti LuPone steals show in modern version of groundbreaking Sondheim musical

    When this groundbreaking musical was premiered in 1970, Stephen Sondheim can scarcely have imagined that one day its central male character would be reimagined as a woman. Sondheim’s original Bobby is a casually womanising New York bachelor who goes through the motions without ever being able to make an emotional commitment. Here, Rosalie Craig plays Bobbie who has a successful career, a smart apartment and no shortage of boyfriends.

  • Dogman review: A brilliant, beguiling comic drama that takes on a tragic hue
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    The Independent

    Dogman review: A brilliant, beguiling comic drama that takes on a tragic hue

    Dogman is one of the best Italian films of recent times, a modern day neorealist fable that bears comparison with the great work of Fellini, Rossellini, De Sica et al. Its main character, the dog groomer Marcello (Marcello Fonte), is a wonderful creation: loveable, vulnerable, seedy and comic all at the same time. Marcello also does a little low-level drug dealing on the side, to earn extra money to spend on his teenage daughter.

  • Halloween review: Delivers all the nasty, spine-tingling pleasures we expect
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    The Independent

    Halloween review: Delivers all the nasty, spine-tingling pleasures we expect

    David Gordon Green’s new addition to the Halloween “slasher” franchise, launched by John Carpenter 40 years ago, is a very creditable update of the grisly old series. It is considerably bolstered by the presence of Jamie Lee Curtis, playing the same character, Laurie Strode, as in the original film.

  • Blue Peter at 60: How did the longest running children’s show come about?
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    The Independent

    Blue Peter at 60: How did the longest running children’s show come about?

    Blue Peter celebrates its 60th birthday today, marking a significant milestone for Britain’s longest-running children’s television show. More than 5,000 episodes have been broadcast, with its most notable hosts including John Noakes, Peter Purves, Janet Ellis and Anthea Turner. Blue Peter was devised by BBC producer John Hunter Blair, who had been asked by Owen Reed, the corporation’s head of children’s programming, to devise a show for five- to eight-year-olds.

  • Porgy and Bess, English National Opera, Coliseum review: Splendid vehicle honours Gershwin’s ambition
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    The Independent

    Porgy and Bess, English National Opera, Coliseum review: Splendid vehicle honours Gershwin’s ambition

    Mired in trouble thanks to a series of avoidable but calamitous artistic misjudgements, English National Opera desperately needs a wise hand on the tiller. This show makes a splendid vehicle for the towering work which would probably have led to more, had Gershwin not died so tragically young. Gershwin’s characterisation may be at times crude, but here the action still feels properly mythical.

  • Indigenous languages are disappearing – and it could impact our perception of the world
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    The Independent

    Indigenous languages are disappearing – and it could impact our perception of the world

    A report warned earlier this year that all of the state’s 20 Native American languages might cease to exist by the end of this century, if the state did not act. American policies, particularly in the six decades between the 1870s and 1930s, suppressed Native American languages and culture. It was only after years of activism by indigenous leaders that the Native American Languages Act was passed in 1990, which allowed for the preservation and protection of indigenous languages.

  • Alec Baldwin claims 'black people love me' after Donald Trump SNL parody
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    The Independent

    Alec Baldwin claims 'black people love me' after Donald Trump SNL parody

    Alec Baldwin has been criticised on social media for claiming "black people love me" after his Saturday Night Live parody of Donald Trump. The actor discussed his amusing Saturday Night Live role as Donald Trump in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, in which he mused about what the portrayal has meant in real life. According to Baldwin, ever since he began doing the impression of the president in 2016, which has since won him an Emmy, “black people love me”.

  • David Hare's 'I'm Not Running', National Theatre, Lyttelton review: An absorbing, flawed evening
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    The Independent

    David Hare's 'I'm Not Running', National Theatre, Lyttelton review: An absorbing, flawed evening

    David Hare's plays have kept up a continuous astringent argument with the Labour Party and what it stands for. Hare's last substantial work in this vein was Gethsemane (2008), in which he dramatised his bitter disillusion with New Labour and its dodgy fundraising and the pragmatic ditching of any Utopian vision. With I'm Not Running, Hare's 17th piece for the National, we were promised a play for the Corbyn era.

  • Jimmy Kimmel tricks people into explaining what they think of Christopher Columbus's nomination to Supreme Court
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    The Independent

    Jimmy Kimmel tricks people into explaining what they think of Christopher Columbus's nomination to Supreme Court

    Jimmy Kimmel celebrated Christopher Columbus Day by asking people what their thoughts were on the explorer’s nomination to the Supreme Court. “There’s a lot going on in the country, so we decided to combine two of the big things going on right now,” Kimmel said on Jimmy Kimmel Live!. According to the late-night host, people should know who Columbus is - as he’s the “third that we learn the most about in elementary school” after George Washington and Abraham Lincoln.

  • Mayerling, Royal Opera House, review: A plunge into glittering darkness
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    The Independent

    Mayerling, Royal Opera House, review: A plunge into glittering darkness

    Created for this company 40 years ago, Kenneth MacMillan’s Mayerling presents the steep decline of Crown Prince Rudolf of Austria, who died in a murder-suicide with his teenaged mistress, Mary Vetsera. Ryoichi Hirano, stepping in for the injured Edward Watson, is too wholesome for MacMillan’s damaged hero, but the company performance is rich and powerful, with a magnificent Mary from Natalia Osipova.

  • Desiree Akhavan interview: 'Bisexuality is taboo in both the queer and the straight world'
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    The Independent

    Desiree Akhavan interview: 'Bisexuality is taboo in both the queer and the straight world'

    When Desiree Akhavan first dreamt up The Bisexual – a comedy-drama series about a lesbian who realises she’s also attracted to men – she pitched the idea to just about every network in LA. The next said they already had a female, brown-skinned lead in The Mindy Project (never mind that Akhavan is Iranian-American, and Mindy Kaling is Indian-American). For most people in her position, such preposterous, blinkered decision-making would be demoralising – but for Akhavan, all it did was “light a fire under my ass”.

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    The Independent

    Navaratri - the Hindu festival honouring the warrior Goddess Durga

    One of the most vibrant Hindu celebrations of the Indian subcontinent, Navaratri is a festival of whirling dance and incessant drumming to mark the victory of good over evil. It is held in honour of the Goddess Durga, who is revered as a divine being of cosmic intelligence with the power to conquer the negative forces of the universe. While it is celebrated over 10 days, Navaratri is Sanskrit for nine (nav) nights (ratri).

  • Kurt Vile interview: 'I'm hypersensitive to the world, my brain gets scattered pretty quick'
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    The Independent

    Kurt Vile interview: 'I'm hypersensitive to the world, my brain gets scattered pretty quick'

    “You guys are being a little weird,” Kurt Vile says to his daughters Awilda, eight, and Delphine, who is almost six. Vile, his wife Suzanne Lang, and their two home-schooled girls live in a house smartly decorated with mid-century modern furniture, in the Mount Airy section of Philadelphia, bordering the forest-like 1,800 acre Wissahickon Valley Park.

  • Yayoi Kusama: How the Instagram generation fell in love with the world’s top-selling living female artist
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    The Independent

    Yayoi Kusama: How the Instagram generation fell in love with the world’s top-selling living female artist

    Yayoi Kusama, at 89 years old, is the world’s top-selling living female artist. Kusama’s work has been hashtagged more than 300,000 times, with Katy Perry, Adele and Nicole Richie all seeking out one of her famous Infinity Mirrored Rooms for a selfie. One of these rooms, titled Infinity Mirrored Room – My Heart is Dancing into the Universe, now forms the centrepiece of an exhibition of new works at the Victoria Miro gallery in London.

  • William Forsythe, A Quiet Evening of Dance at Sadler's Wells, London review: Introspective and playful
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    The Independent

    William Forsythe, A Quiet Evening of Dance at Sadler's Wells, London review: Introspective and playful

    William Forsythe’s A Quiet Evening of Dance is literally quiet: soundtrack from silence to birdsong to baroque dances by Rameau. It makes a cerebral, sometimes funny evening: Forsythe tenderly taking ballet to bits, so he can expose and play with its mechanisms. Produced by Sadler’s Wells, A Quiet Evening is Forsythe’s first full-length programme since he closed The Forsythe Company in 2015.

  • Frieze 2018: Where women have parity in the art world
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    The Independent

    Frieze 2018: Where women have parity in the art world

    In that context, Frieze London and Frieze Masters, the sibling art fairs taking place from Thursday to Sunday in Regent’s Park, are notable: women have most of the leadership positions, and they have pushed for female-centric programming at every level. “They’re trying to counter the effects of the male-dominated art market,” says Diana Campbell Betancourt, the curator who is this year in charge of Frieze Projects, the parts of the contemporary-focused Frieze London that extend beyond the traditional dealer booths. “They are leading by example,” Betancourt says.

  • Bryony Kimmings interview: 'Imagine if we were living in a matriarchy? That would be amazing'
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    The Independent

    Bryony Kimmings interview: 'Imagine if we were living in a matriarchy? That would be amazing'

    Performance artist Bryony Kimmings has become known for boldly going where few others would with her provocative, autobiographical social-experiment-cum-theatre shows. From celebrity culture to feminism, depression to cancer, Kimmings fearlessly mines her own experiences for creative ways to tackle our most taboo topics, prompting discussion, outrage, and entertaining in equal measure.

  • Carlos Acosta: A Celebration, Royal Albert Hall, review: An uneven group of dances
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    The Independent

    Carlos Acosta: A Celebration, Royal Albert Hall, review: An uneven group of dances

    Carlos Acosta is very much loved, but sometimes he tries the patience. This celebration programme shows off the star’s warmth and charisma, but also drags an uneven group of dances, from Christopher Bruce’s Rolling Stones ballet Rooster to Acosta’s own unfortunate Carmen, into the barn-like space of the Royal Albert Hall. A Celebration marks the 30 years of Acosta’s dance career.

  • The Cry review: Jenna Coleman shines as an unravelling new mother
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    The Independent

    The Cry review: Jenna Coleman shines as an unravelling new mother

    In fact, if the BBC ever decides to do a crossover episode, Joanna could do with a friend like Liz from BBC2’s brilliant dark comedy Motherland, whose refreshingly lax advice for a children’s birthday party is to “buy four caterpillar cakes from Asda and put them together to make one big Human Centipede cake, then just let the kids help themselves. “Is he not hot?” Her political aide husband Alistair, played by Ewen Leslie, isn’t much help. It is this deftly handled depiction of parenting that makes The Cry, based on a novel by Helen Fitzgerald, worth watching – not the dramatic abduction to which the first episode is building.

  • A New Beginning: How these people are changing the stereotype of refugees
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    The Independent

    A New Beginning: How these people are changing the stereotype of refugees

    Each person has been photographed by a group of renowned artists including Nick Waplington, Campbell Addy, Diana Markosian and duo Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, all of whom have visually reflected the diverse character of the refugee experience in the UK. “We learn the English language in schools back home, but other than that we don’t have much access to British culture – all the movies and TV we consume are American.