The special meaning behind the flowers on The Queen's coffin

·1-min read
Photo credit: WPA Pool - Getty Images
Photo credit: WPA Pool - Getty Images

Each element of The Queen's funeral has been carefully considered. In particular, the flowers placed on top of The Queen's coffin, which was carried in procession from Westminster Hall to Westminster Abbey carry huge significance.

Photo credit: WPA Pool - Getty Images
Photo credit: WPA Pool - Getty Images

Placed alongside the Royal Imperial crown, orb and sceptre, the floral wreath is made up of flowers and foliage selected personally by her son, King Charles III.

Photo credit: Chris Jackson - Getty Images
Photo credit: Chris Jackson - Getty Images

The flowers, in shades of pink, deep burgundy, white and gold, to reflect the Royal Standard, include pelargoniums, roses, autumnal hydrangea, sedum, dahlias and scabious. There is also rosemary, for remembrance, myrtle, a symbol of happy marriage, and English oak, which symbolises the strength of love.

Photo credit: WPA Pool - Getty Images
Photo credit: WPA Pool - Getty Images

Nestled amongst the large display of flowers is a note with a handwritten message, which says: 'In loving and devoted memory – Charles R'.

Photo credit: WPA Pool - Getty Images
Photo credit: WPA Pool - Getty Images

The BBC confirmed the wreath contains flowers from Buckingham Palace, Clarence House and Highgrove House.

The official Royal Family Twitter account revealed that, at the King's request, the myrtle included in the wreath is cut from a plant grown from the sprig of myrtle that was in the Queen's wedding bouquet in 1947.

As per The King's request, the wreath has been made sustainably without the use of floral foam and is instead presented in a nest of English moss.

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