'We can sleep a little easier tonight': Tom Parker's brain tumour is 'under control'

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Aurelia, Tom, Bodhi and Kelsey Parker (c) Instagram credit:Bang Showbiz
Aurelia, Tom, Bodhi and Kelsey Parker (c) Instagram credit:Bang Showbiz

Tom Parker's brain tumour is "under control".

The Wanted star - who has daughter Aurelia, two, and son Bodhi, 12 months, with his wife Kelsey - is feeling a "mix of emotions" after being told that his inoperable glioblastoma is now "stable" and admitted his family can "sleep a little easier".

Alongside a family photograph, the 33-year-old singer wrote: "I’m sat here with tears in my eyes as i tell you. We’ve got my brain tumour under control. We had the results from my latest scan…and I’m delighted to say it is STABLE. Such a mix of emotions . We couldn’t ask for any more really at this point; a year or so in to this journey. Honestly over the moon. We can sleep a little easier tonight. Thank you for all your love and support over the last 12+ months. Love from Me,Kelsey, Aurelia & Bo."

The 'Glad You Came' hitmaker was given 12 to 18 months of survival when he was diagnosed last year, but after undergoing six rounds of chemotherapy and 30 radiotherapy sessions, Tom said last month he was hoping to be cancer-free by March.

He said: "You’ll always be classed as terminal.

"They give you 12 to 18 months of survival. But that’s the general statistics. Everyone we’ve ­spoken to has been way, way beyond that.

"Now, we’re aiming to be cancer free by March. That’s the aim. This disease is always there. You might have residual cells but just not active. So, we’ll just carry on, just crack on and see where we get to."

Tom saw his weight plummet to just 7st 7lb after six weeks of radiation sessions, and he even considered quitting the treatment.

He added: "Those were the darkest days of my life. Going up there and lying under those radiation machines were awful. It’s awful. It’s unnerving.

"You’re thinking, ‘Is this doing any good? Is this making a difference? Is there any point in me doing this if I’m going to die? I’m not putting myself through this.'

"And chemo was brutal. I wouldn’t wish it on anyone."

Tom recently admitted he is keen to try for another kid.

He said: "I’ve always wanted four children so I think we’ll try again in a year or two.

"The kids have been a saving grace for us during this time.

"They are our reason to get up and face every day."

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