Sir Rod Stewart’s wife Penny Lancaster among police guarding Queen Elizabeth’s coffin

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Penny Lancaster was among the lines of police guarding Queen Elizabeth’s coffin as it was driven to Buckingham Palace credit:Bang Showbiz
Penny Lancaster was among the lines of police guarding Queen Elizabeth’s coffin as it was driven to Buckingham Palace credit:Bang Showbiz

Penny Lancaster was among the lines of police guarding Queen Elizabeth’s coffin as it was driven to Buckingham Palace.

Sir Rod Stewart’s special constable wife, 51, was pictured in her uniform at RAF Northolt in front of the British monarch’s coffin as Her Majesty’s casket made its way to her former home of 70 years on Tuesday (13.09.22)

Penny started working as a police officer with the City of London force in 2021 following her completion of formal training, after she applied for the role after taking part in a reality TV show called ‘Famous and Fighting Crime’ that saw her shadow officers on the streets.

She was seen on Tuesday helping with one of Britain’s biggest ever security operations by watching over the coffin and assisting in marshalling some of the tens of thousands of people who have amassed on London to say farewell to the Queen.

Mum-of-two Penny, who has been married to ‘Maggie May’ singer Sir Rod since 2007, was seen at one point helping a woman in a wheelchair with her support dog.

She has racked up a huge number of hours on the beat and earlier this year made an arrest after pulling over a drug-driving suspect.

Penny said about the job on BBC One’s Crimewatch Live show earlier this year: “It’s roughly about 200 hours a year which equates for myself to one duty a week in the City of London Square Mile including bridges there.

“It’s predominantly foot patrol but I also get the opportunity to try other areas of policing out like working in vehicles, working with the sniffer dogs and operations like the London Marathon, the Lord Mayor’s Show and coming up the Jubilee.

“I think being a mum and having the patience and the empathy to deal with teenagers in particular helps.

“A lot of the time you think policing and you think crime but you’re dealing with victims.”

She says she is sticking with the job despite Sir Rod being worried about the “natural risks” involved.

Penny added he’s “able to go back to sleep” when she is on the job when she reassures him about the support she has from colleagues.