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I shower with my children — haters think it’s ‘disturbing’ but we love bathing together

(Left) Mom and daughter taking bubble bath. (Right) Mom toweling off her child after bath time. (Inset) A kid just getting out of the bath and using a towel.
On Instagram, mom influencer Bronte Towns, a mother of four from Australia, virally explained the educational perks of taking family showers with her kids.

There’s a rubba-dub-double benefit to bathing with your brood — just ask this full-frontal mama.

Scrubbing away the stench of stigma, an unabashed mother of four children under age 8 is virally spotlighting the pros of taking “family showers” with her tots.

And beyond saving time and conserving water, the blond says group grooming teaches her tikes — a set of 18-month-old fraternal twins, as well as two sons ages 2 and 7 — the ins and outs of human anatomy and body autonomy.

“Here [are] the main reasons why I shower with my kids,” began Brontë Towns, an Australian mommy influencer, in the caption of an Instagram Reel dedicated to the seemingly peculiar practice.

A mom influencer says family bathing gives her kids the chance to see how everyday bodies change as they get older. Getty Images
A mom influencer says family bathing gives her kids the chance to see how everyday bodies change as they get older. Getty Images
Mom influencer Bronte Towns took to Instagram to explain the educational perks of taking family showers with her kids. Instagram/@journeyofanhonestmum
Mom influencer Bronte Towns took to Instagram to explain the educational perks of taking family showers with her kids. Instagram/@journeyofanhonestmum

“[It’s a] natural way to teach them biology,” she continued beneath the clip, which has amassed more than 13 million likes. “Helps them have a healthy understanding of different bodily functions [and] appreciation for their own body.”

Towns added, “This is a fabulous way to open up discussions on why some people might choose to keep body hair or shave it off, have stripes on their tummy, or where body parts are located without big stigma around it.”

The millennial mom also boasted about the intimate bonds built during family bath time.

“So many questions pop up naturally when you shower together. We normalize open conversations in the shower there’s no silly questions, nothing too awkward to ask,” she insisted.

Towns added that the tub has become a safe space for educating her children on personal boundaries and consent.

“It’s a supportive environment where innocent, curious questions can be asked and answered age-appropriately,” she said before noting that mommy-and-me sponging ensures kids are learning proper hygiene routines, too.

“Showering with them regularly offers many opportunities for healthy hygiene habits to form,” said Towns. “Things don’t slip through the cracks as much.”

She lastly pointed to body positivity as a plus of the atypical preening.

“[It normalizes] everyday bodies, not a stigmatized version most of our kids see all over advertising or online,” said the nonsense matriarch. “ All bodies change, grow, shrink, get stretch marks, veins, body hair, the list goes on.

While virtual haters scolded Towns for bathing with her kids, the mom of four maintained that the practice is a healthy way to educate children about their bodies. Getty Images
While virtual haters scolded Towns for bathing with her kids, the mom of four maintained that the practice is a healthy way to educate children about their bodies. Getty Images

“Instead of only seeing the polished versions they see ‘normality.’”

While most folks applauded Towns’ unflinching explanation, cyber trolls waterlogged the mom with shame and disapproval.

“What. The. Hell,” questioned a critic.

Towns says family bathing gives her kids the chance to see how everyday bodies change as they get older. Getty Images
Towns says family bathing gives her kids the chance to see how everyday bodies change as they get older. Getty Images

“No that’s disturbing [and] imagine having memories of your mom’s naked body,” spat a separate social media naysayer.

“I never ever ever want to see either of my parents naked, nor would I want my [two] daughters to see me naked. Please don’t normalize this our society [is] turning to s—t,” blasted an equally perturbed complainer.

“Ewwww no. Your son is way too old to be seeing you naked. Tf is wrong with you?” another chimed.

However, Towns did note that “at no point did I state which of my kids shower with me or not.”

It turns out that Towns’ tribe aren’t the only little ones to wash up alongside mom and dad.

Cooper says he’s “totally” comfortable being naked around his six-year-old daughter, Lea, because his own father was “always” naked around him as a kid. Getty Images for Netflix
Cooper says he’s “totally” comfortable being naked around his six-year-old daughter, Lea, because his own father was “always” naked around him as a kid. Getty Images for Netflix

Bradley Cooper recently revealed that he “always” took showers with his now-late father, Charles, as a kid.

In fact, the 49-year-old “Maestro” star attributes his father’s constant nudity to his own unwavering comfort with being naked around his 6-year-old daughter, Lea, in the bathroom or bedroom.

And although pediatric psychologist Wendy Lane concedes that co-cleansing could be a great way for youngsters to learn about bodies, she warns that too much parent-child shower time could send some folks treading into dangerous waters.

“No one should be touching their private parts, unless providing assistance with toileting or bathing, if needed,” Lane, from the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital, told “Today.”

“Bathing with children should always stop if the child asks to stop,” she continued, citing the age range between 3 and 5 as the time when most children prefer to shower independently.

Towns agrees.

“Whenever [children] feel uncomfortable or get ‘too curious,’ that’s a good indicator that a child has outgrown this routine,” she said of family scrubs.

“This is about promoting [and] protecting one another’s boundaries,” she added.

“This no-fuss way of educating must always be led in an appropriate manner with mutual respect.”