Sharon Osbourne says she and husband Ozzy plan to die by assisted suicide if their mental abilities decline

Sharon Osbourne says she and husband Ozzy plan to die by assisted suicide if their mental abilities decline

Sharon Osbourne has reminded her children of her and husband Ozzy Osbourne’s plan to die by assisted suicide, if their physical and mental health takes a severe decline.

The former music manager and The Talk panellist, 71, initially discussed her end-of-life plans while promoting her 2007 memoir Survivor: My Story – The Next Chapter.

In an interview at the time, Sharon said that she and Ozzy had come to the decision to visit a euthanasia facility in Switzerland, where the practice is legal.

“Ozzy and I have absolutely come to the same decision,” she told the Mirror. “We believe 100 per cent in euthanasia so have drawn up plans to go to the assisted suicide flat in Switzerland if we ever have an illness that affects our brains. If Ozzy or I ever got Alzheimer’s, that’s it – we’d be off.”

Sharon confirmed that their position on the matter hadn’t changed on the most recent episode of The Osbournes Podcast, hosted alongside Ozzy, 74, daughter Kelly, 38, and son Jack, 37.

“Do you remember when Mum and Dad did that interview, talking about how they were gonna go and die through assisted suicide, and we were like ‘What the f*** is this?’” Kelly asked Jack.

Jack replied: “They were like, ‘If we get terminally ill, we’re going to go to Switzerland and assisted suicide ourselves.’ Is that still the plan?”

“Do you think that we’re gonna suffer?” Sharon asked, before laughing. To Jack’s proposal that “we [are] already all suffering”, she continued: “Yes, we all are, but I don’t want it to actually hurt, as well.

“Mental suffering is enough pain without physical. So if you’ve got mental and physical, see ya.”

Ozzy Osbourne and Sharon Osbourne (Getty Images for The Recording Academy)
Ozzy Osbourne and Sharon Osbourne (Getty Images for The Recording Academy)

She then clarified that if she had the chance to live longer while struggling with mental and physical issues, she’d decide against it.

“What if you survived and you can’t wipe your own ass, you’re p***ing everywhere, s***ing, can’t eat,” Sharon said.

“So, what’s different about your life [now]?” Kelly joked.

Sharon’s strong view on having an assisted death is largely influenced by watching her father, music manager Don Arden, suffer from Alzheimer’s disease before his death in 2007.

Then, in 2014, Ozzy spoke of his desire to die by medically assisted suicide in the case of any “life-threatening condition.”

“If I can’t live my life the way I’m living it now – and I don’t mean financially – then that’s it...[Switzerland],” he told the Mirror.

“If I can’t get up and go to the bathroom myself and I’ve got tubes up my ass and an enema in my throat, then I’ve said to Sharon, ‘Just turn the machine off.’ If I had a stroke and was paralyzed, I don’t want to be here. I’ve made a will and it’s all going to Sharon if I die before her, so ultimately it will all go to the kids.”

If you are experiencing feelings of distress, or are struggling to cope, you can speak to the Samaritans, in confidence, on 116 123 (UK and ROI), email jo@samaritans.org, or visit the Samaritans website to find details of your nearest branch.

If you are based in the USA, and you or someone you know needs mental health assistance right now, call the National Suicide Prevention Helpline on 1-800-273-TALK (8255). This is a free, confidential crisis hotline that is available to everyone 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

If you are in another country, you can go to www.befrienders.org to find a helpline near you.