Sharon Osbourne fears she'll always be haunted by racism accusations

·2-min read
Sharon Osbourne fears she will always have to live with the fall out from her exit from The Talk. credit:Bang Showbiz
Sharon Osbourne fears she will always have to live with the fall out from her exit from The Talk. credit:Bang Showbiz

Sharon Osbourne fears racism accusations which swirled around her exit from 'The Talk' will haunt her for the rest of her life.

The wife of rocker Ozzy Osbourne left the panel show last year after a heated on-air exchange about race with co-star Sheryl Underwood after Sharon defended her pal Piers Morgan over comments he made about the Duchess of Sussex - and Sharon fears being called racist for supporting him will taint her for life.

Speaking on an appearance on 'Good Morning America', she explained: "Like I said on the show, ’You’ve now planted that seed. That will never leave me. You’ve planted that seed. The damage is done' ...

"No more saying sorry, ’cause I’m not. Cause I didn’t do anything wrong except ask questions."

Sharon was joined for the chat by her Black Sabbath star husband Ozzy, who echoed her sentiment about the accusations.

He said: "When you’re accused of that, by saying, ‘I’m not racist,’ it’s like being accused of [being] a paedophile. “It’s one of those things now that you - by saying you’re not, they think you are more. It’s like - it’s a stigma."

Sharon went on to insist it took her a long time to deal with the fall out from the drama, adding: "What happened to me. The way I felt about it. The amount of time it took me mentally to get over it. And just to show I have - got over it."

Speaking last year, Sharon's former co-host Sheryl opened up about what happened and admitted she felt anxious talking about the row because she didn’t want to be perceived as “angry”.

She explained: "I didn't want to escalate things with Sharon because I thought I was having a conversation with a friend. But also, I knew I had to be an example for others to follow because I didn't want to be perceived as the angry black woman. And that really scared me. I didn't want to be that. "I wanted to remain calm and remain focused. It's difficult to go back to that day because I feel the trauma, I feel fearful, a little apprehensive."