Rugby Championship 2022: Fixtures, team news and how to watch on TV

·3-min read
Malcolm Marx of South Africa during The Rugby Championship match between South Africa and New Zealand at Mbombela Stadium on August 06, 2022 in Nelspruit, South Africa - Dirk Kotze/Gallo Images/Getty Images
Malcolm Marx of South Africa during The Rugby Championship match between South Africa and New Zealand at Mbombela Stadium on August 06, 2022 in Nelspruit, South Africa - Dirk Kotze/Gallo Images/Getty Images

New Zealand go into this year’s Rugby Championship as the reigning champions, but after being thrashed by South Africa in the opening game, they are certainly not favourites.

How to watch the matches on TV

(All times BST)

Round 1

Round 2

  • South Africa v New Zealand (Emirates Airlines Park, Johannesburg) 4.05pm on Saturday, August 13 - Sky Sports

  • Argentina v Australia (Estadio Bicentenario, San Juan) 8.10pm on Saturday, August 13 - Sky Sports

Round 3

  • Australia v South Africa (Adelaide Oval, Adelaide) 6.30am on Saturday, August 27  - Sky Sports

  • New Zealand v Argentina (Orangetheory Stadium, Christchurch) 8.45am on Saturday, August 27 - Sky Sports

Round 4

  • New Zealand v Argentina (FMG Stadium Waikato, Hamilton) 8.05am on Saturday, September 3 - Sky Sports

  • Australia vs South Africa (Allianz Stadium, Sydney) 10.35am on Saturday, September 3 - Sky Sports

Round 5

  • Australia vs New Zealand (Marvel Stadium, Melbourne) 10.45am on Thursday, September 15 - Sky Sports

  • Argentina vs South Africa (Estadio Jose Amalfitani, Buenos Aires) 8.10pm on Saturday, September 17 - Sky Sports

Round 6

  • New Zealand vs Australia (Eden Park, Auckland) 8.05am on Saturday, September 24 - Sky Sports

  • South Africa vs Argentina (Hollywoodbets Kings Park, Durban) 4.05pm on Saturday, September 24 - Sky Sports

What is the latest news?

Argentina will add extra emphasis on their mauling in training this week and look to avoid the errors that cost them in Saturday’s clash against Australia when they meet again next weekend, coach Michael Cheika said.

The Wallabies mauled over for two late tries to turn around a 26-17 deficit and win their opening match 41-26.

“I thought we did really well for the first 50 or 60 minutes and then Australia did really well to come back and attack and pressure us. We went a bit individual at the time and were therefore caught out,” Cheika said after the loss against the team he used to coach.

“The biggest area was obviously three tries from the maul, so that’s something we really want to fix. It’s not acceptable.

“We see that as a front line of our team, and that was really disappointing as a team and it’s something we need to work on and transfer into the game,” he said as the focus turns to this Saturday’s meeting in San Juan.

Saturday’s clash in Mendoza proved a see-saw affair before Australia were awarded a penalty try, just after the hour mark, when Argentina illegally tried to stop a driving maul and lock Matias Alemanno was yellow carded to compound their misery.

That proved the turning point and the win was sealed with another try from a driving maul for hooker Folau Fainga’a.

Cheika, who was the Wallabies coach from 2014-2019, added that poor decision making at vital moments also proved costly.

“We have to work harder now. We mustn’t give up on the goals we’ve set ourselves and we are looking to keep putting layer upon layer on our performances,” the Pumas coach added

When is the final round?

The final round is on Saturday 24 September. New Zealand host Australia in Auckland, while Argentina travel to Durban to face South Africa.

Last year New Zealand had already wrapped up the Rugby Championship before the final round, after beating South Africa 19-17 in the penultimate round. However, the Springboks would beat the All Blacks 31-29 a week later to end their campaign on a high.

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