The Royal Wedding Is Already Influencing Shopping Trends in a Big Way

Whitney Bauck

A new report by eBay explores how web searches shifted after Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's big day.

Photo: Ben Stansall/WPA Pool/Getty Images

This weekend, 29 million Americans and 24 million people in the UK tuned in to watch Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's royal wedding, from which the couple emerged officially as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex. With that kind of massive viewership, it's unsurprising that the royal wedding has already influenced shoppers.

According to a report released by eBay, there are a few easy-to-spot trends that appeared in terms of search traffic after the weekend's festivities. The first had to do with designers whose dresses were prominently worn at the wedding: Givenchy, the label behind the Duchess's wedding ceremony gown, catapulted to the top of eBay's search charts on Saturday. Vivienne Westwood, which was responsible for Priyanka Chopra's lavender look, and Alexander McQueen, which was behind Kate Middleton's dress, followed behind. Stella McCartney, the designer responsible for the Duchess's second look of the day, as well as both Amal Clooney and Oprah's outfits, also saw a boost.

While those major labels topped the most-searched chart list, two slightly smaller brands enjoyed the largest jump in search percentages. Searches for The Fold, the British brand responsible for Pippa Middleton's floral dress, jumped a whopping 700 percent the day of the wedding, and Roksanda, the label behind Princess Beatrice's look, saw a 500 percent leap.

In addition, eBay noted that pink dresses — like those worn by Oprah and Serena Williams — saw an increase in search traffic, as did yellow ones, in homage to Amal Clooney's bold look. Polka dot dresses also saw a 20 percent jump in traffic, perhaps pointing to the influence of the Duchess's former "Suits" co-star Abigail Spencer's dress. Tiaras, like the one the Duchess wore with her veil, saw a 72 percent spike in traffic on the day of the wedding in comparison to the day prior.

But it turns out that not everyone wanted to get in on the royal wedding fun by dressing like someone who was there — some just wanted something, anything, that was connected to the new Duchess herself, with "Meghan Markle related items" seeing 47 percent more sales and 146 percent more searches on the big day. Prince Harry got left behind in that equation, as searches related to his name only saw a third of the numbers his wife's did, but somehow, we get the feeling he's happy enough just to be with his new bride.

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