Queen Flaunts Engagement Ring In Upcoming 'The Unseen Queen' Documentary, Which Shows Private Footage

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Photo credit: Screengrab - BBC
Photo credit: Screengrab - BBC

Ahead of Queen Elizabeth II's Platinum Jubilee celebrations in June, commemorating her 70-plus years on the throne, a BBC documentary is being released in her honour.

Elizabeth: The Unseen Queen, which runs for 75-minute on May 29, charts pinnacle moments in the longest reigning monarch's life, including when she got engaged to Prince Philip.

Footage that will air in the documentary specifically shows Her Majesty, known as Princess Elizabeth at the time, in awe of her engagement ring during a holiday at Balmoral Castle in Scotland in 1946 - a while before her wedding was announced.

Revealing never-before-seen home movies of the monarch, the documentary shows her journey from a young princess to her coronation on June 2, 1953 at Westminster Abbey.

As well as documenting post-engagement footage, it discloses the royal family's archive of personal films and uncovers additional images.

Photo credit: Screengrab - BBC
Photo credit: Screengrab - BBC

Two were released on Saturday, including one of the Queen and her late sister Princess Margaret with their father King George VI onboard the HMS Vanguard in 1947.

The second was taken during Her Majesty's visit to South Africa in 1947.

What's more, home movies included in the documentary date back to the 1920s and have been kept private for decades by the British Film Institute on behalf of the Royal Collection Trust.

The BBC said the documentary will show the Queen being pushed in a pram right up until ascending the throne aged 27.

She took the reins from her father George VI.

Photo credit: Screengrab - BBC
Photo credit: Screengrab - BBC

Footage also captures her royal upbringing, relationship with her parents and the Duke of Edinburgh's first extended trip to Balmoral in 1946 after their engagement.

Additional moments shared include the Queen's parents and their grandchildren, Prince Charles and Princess Anne, and the royal family at Balmoral in 1951 - the king's last visit.

The Queen's voice and words heavily narrate the documentary.

A palace spokesperson told People: 'It's through her own eyes and in her own words across her reign.'

According to the news outlet, the Queen has permitted use of the images but is yet to see the film, which is incomplete.

'This documentary is an extraordinary glimpse into a deeply personal side of the Royal Family that is rarely seen, and it's wonderful to be able to share it with the nation as we mark her Platinum Jubilee,' said Simon Young, BBC Commissioning Editor for History.

Last week it was reported that Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will bring their children Archie, three and Lilibet, 11 months, to the Queen's Platinum Jubilee, after much speculation as to whether or not their would fly over from California for the events.

As per Hello!, a spokesperson for the couple said: 'Prince Harry and Meghan, The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are excited and honoured to attend The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee celebrations this June with their children.'

Photo credit: Getty Images
Photo credit: Getty Images

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex's anticipated trip will mark the first time they've brought their family to the UK since moving to Montecito in 2020, after they left their roles as senior royals.

This follows Prince Harry and Markle reportedly telling the Queen, who's yet to meet Lilibet, that she'll get to hug her great-grandchildren 'in the near future'.

In April, we learned that Her Majesty 'will limit her upcoming Platinum Jubilee celebrations' due to her frailty.

Prince William and Kate Middleton are understood to me moving to Windsor to be closer to the Queen, who is set to permanently live at Windsor Castle and not return to Buckingham Palace full-time.

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