People reveal the many, many flaws with the new 'consent' condom

Francesca Specter
Yahoo Style UK deputy editor
People are not sold on the idea of a “consent condom”. [Photo: Twitter]

An Argentinian company have been slated for a so-called “consent condom” which requires four hands to open.

The condom was unveiled in a promotional video shared from the official Twitter account for Tulipan, an adult toys and condom company.

The video includes the hashtag #PlacerConsentido, which means “permitted pleasure”.

READ MORE: Barber’s ‘free condom’ marketing strategy goes wrong

Created by advertising agency BBDO Argentina, the clip showcases a condom box which requires four hands to open it by clicking four buttons on the top and sides of the box simultaneously, in order to demonstrate their sexual consent.

However, the product has been met with scepticism on Twitter.

Users have voiced a number of objections to the product, deeming it “utter bullshit”.

It benefits the wrong person

The promotional video features a tagline which translates as: “If it’s not a yes, it’s a no,” and “Without consent there is no pleasure”.

Except, several people have objected the condom might be misused as a means of “proving” consent in rape trials, even if this is not truly the case.

Consent can change at any time

What’s more, “consent” is not reserved to a single moment.

Several people shared the argument that sexual consent can be taken away at any time during intercourse, before or after a condom is involved. So-called sexual consent apps have been criticised for the same reason.

Therefore, a condom which irrevocably “proves” consent after it is opened is problematic.

People shouldn’t be discouraged from using condoms

Others pointed to the importance of using condoms during sex in the first place in order to prevent STIs and unwanted pregnancy.

With this in mind, they took issue with the idea of something which might dissuade people from doing so.

 

Potential rapists likely don’t care about using a condom

Some people objecting to the product have suggested someone who is capable of rape would not be using a condom in the first place.

It does not consider people with disabilities

Even if this condom were to be used practically, many have pointed out it is designed for able-bodied people with two functioning hands.

You probably don’t need two people to open it

From another perspective, it was suggested a person could easily tamper with the product if they wanted to, taking away the need for four hands.

It doesn’t go far enough

Ultimately, there was a sense the makers behind this product took too narrow a view of sexual consent.

READ MORE: STIs are on the rise among young people

People argued it is much more important to educate adults about sexual consent rather than to simply make a “statement” product.

Last year, a nationwide poll pointed to the need for greater education around sexual consent.

The poll of 2003 participants aged between 14 and 55 by the Family Planning Association (FPA) for Sexual Health Week 2018, also found that 9% of those asked said that it wasn’t okay to withdraw consent if you’ve been bought dinner or drinks.

Some 53% of those polled also didn’t think it’s OK for someone to withdraw sexual consent if they’ve already taken their clothes off.