Is it okay to shower with your child? Psychiatrist weighs in after Bradley Cooper admits he ‘always’ bathed with his dad

Bradley Cooper claimed that his father Charles was
Bradley Cooper claimed that his father Charles was "always nude" around the house when he was growing up.

Bradley Cooper recently came clean about his childhood bathing habits, saying he “always” showered with his dad while growing up.

The “Maestro” star, now 49, made the confession late last month, saying his father Charles often went nude around the house.

As a result, Cooper now doesn’t worry about being in the bathroom at the same time as his daughter, Lea, 6.

“We talk where I’m on the toilet, she’s in the bathtub; that’s sort of the go-to,” the star said during an interview on Dax Shepherd’s “Armchair Expert” podcast.

Now, a pediatric psychologist has weighed in on whether parents should shower with their kids after some haters hit out, describing it as “disgusting”

Cooper and his dad, Charles, are pictured together in 2010. Charles passed away the following year at the age of 71.
Cooper and his dad, Charles, are pictured together in 2010. Charles passed away the following year at the age of 71.

Dr. Wendy Lane, who works at the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital, said it can actually be beneficial for children to rinse off with their parents during their early years —but the practice should stop around the age of 5.

“It can be a way to learn accurate names for body parts, explain the physical difference between genders, explain that bodies change while growing up, and teach children about personal boundaries,” Lane told Today.

“Letting children know that their bodies are their own is important,” she added.

However, she made sure to note that “no one should be touching their private parts, unless providing assistance with toileting or bathing, if needed.”

Lane further stated that showering with a child should “always stop” when the child no longer wants to do it, which usually happens between the ages of 3 and 5.

Dr. Wendy Lane, who works at the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital, said it can actually be beneficial for children to rinse off with their parents during their early years —but the practice should stop around the age of 5. umaryland.edu
Dr. Wendy Lane, who works at the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital, said it can actually be beneficial for children to rinse off with their parents during their early years —but the practice should stop around the age of 5. umaryland.edu

Meanwhile, Shepherd told Cooper on the podcast that he also doesn’t have much privacy from his children in the bathroom.

Shepherd said his daughters, Lincoln, 10, and Delta, 9, regularly “file in” to the bathroom to talk during his “poopy time,” which Cooper could also relate to.

“My bedroom, the bathtub, and toilet, and bed are all in the same room,” Cooper explained.

Cooper is pictured with his daughter, Lea. FilmMagic
Cooper is pictured with his daughter, Lea. FilmMagic

“It’s 24/7, dude,” he added about his unbothered lack of privacy. “There are no doors… The stairs go up and it’s all one floor.”

Coopers father, Charles, died in 2011 at the age of 71.