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NYC dogs and locals dress to impress in their Sunday best at Easter Parade

Easter on Fifth Avenue will be pawsitively pastel.

Amongst the revelers decked out in creative and colorful hats at this year’s Easter Parade and Bonnet Festival, twin chihuahuas Bogie and Kimba will be dressing as dandies, in pastel suits and $125 top hats complete with faux fur bunny ears.

“Kimba’s the white one, so he’s going to have white bunny ears, and Bogie’s the black one, so black ones. Each hat takes approximately one day [to make] from start to finish,” said the dogs’ owner, pet couturier, and fashion designer Anthony Rubio.

Pet couturier and fashion designer Anthony Rubio said he was one of the first to bring dogs to the parade. Michael Nagle
Pet couturier and fashion designer Anthony Rubio said he was one of the first to bring dogs to the parade. Michael Nagle

“I chose the dandy theme because it is so proper and polished. I always associate Easter Sunday attire with the depictions of old Hollywood musicals which brought me so much joy.”

The annual Midtown holiday tradition, which dates back to the 1870s, runs along Fifth Avenue from East 49th to East 57th Street, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Easter Sunday.

Rubio, a Bronx native, has walked in the parade with his fur babies, who are now 12, since they were six months old — and was one of the first to bring pups.

“When we first went, there were none. People were like, ‘You dressed the dogs? What are you doing?’ And now, everybody loves this,” Rubio told The Post.

Milliner Anne DePasquale’s bonnet would retail for $3,000 to $5,000. Michael Nagle
Milliner Anne DePasquale’s bonnet would retail for $3,000 to $5,000. Michael Nagle

Over the years, he’s befriended tourists in the crowd there “who are dazzled and bewildered” by his pets’ lavish costumes.

“They expect the people to be dressed, but when they see the dogs, they gather all the kids and want to take pictures with them,” he explained.

He’s even seen celebrities at the parade, who sometimes go unnoticed amidst all the fanfare, like Bernadette Peters, the late actor Leslie Jordan, and “Saturday Night Live” cast members.

“There’s so much going on that people don’t even realize when there’s a celebrity right under their nose,” he said.

Patricia Parenti is donning a headpiece from designer <a href="https://www.etsy.com/shop/doramarra" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Dora Marra;elm:context_link;itc:0;sec:content-canvas" class="link ">Dora Marra</a> of Headdress NY. Michael Nagle
Patricia Parenti is donning a headpiece from designer Dora Marra of Headdress NY. Michael Nagle

On the human side, Milliner Anne DePasquale took three days to create her parade hat — made of straw, tissue paper roses, silk flowers, fake clementines, and foam and feather butterflies and birds — which she said would retail for $3,000 to $5,000.

“The flowers on the front of the hat are handmade by me,” she said. “I dye crepe paper, hand cut each layer then piece it together to create the flower.”

DePasquale, 53, who creates hats for film, TV, and Broadway, will be marching with her husband.

“We love to go. It’s one of my favorite events in New York,” she said. “There’s tons of creative people.”

She will meet up with friends like Patricia Parenti, who has been attending since the ’80s and will be donning a headpiece from designer Dora Marra of Headdress NY.

“It’s a bunny who is wearing a hat adorned with spring flowers and butterflies,” she explained of the creation, which retails for $500.

Bed-Stuy resident Grace Abbott will be participating in the parade with her daughter Lucy. Helayne Seidman
Bed-Stuy resident Grace Abbott will be participating in the parade with her daughter Lucy. Helayne Seidman

Bed-Stuy resident Grace Abbott has been participating in the parade for close to a decade — and this year, her 6-year-old daughter, Lucy, will march alongside her for the first time.

The mother-daughter duo will wear matching bonnets for the occasion, which Abbott, 37, said is “like my Super Bowl.”

“It’s something that I look forward to every year, to make just something super badass, where whatever you want and have a ball,” she said.

The Arizona native enjoys seeing the “level of craftsmanship” in participants’ original ensembles — and “identifying the veterans you see every single year.”

The labor of love took her seven hours to complete. Helayne Seidman
The labor of love took her seven hours to complete. Helayne Seidman

To craft her bonnets, including another for a friend who will be coming, she used straw hats and cut up a chiffon curtain, and added tissue paper, velvet, jewels, pipe cleaners, and fake flowers.

The labor of love took her seven hours to complete and she bought all the materials at a discount store, which cost her a total of $50.

“I don’t really go for the extreme Easter effect. Some people do a lot of the eggs and the bunnies,” she said.

“Mine’s more, I have a time to make this beautiful hat and I’m going to use it.”