Nail Salons Are Set to Reopen on 12 April 2021, According to Government's New Roadmap

Tori Crowther
·1-min read
Nail technician Hannah Jones wears a PPE face shield and mask as she paints the nails of customer Lynsey Scott at The Beauty Rooms in Oxton, Birkenhead, north west England on July 13, 2020 as novel coronavirus lockdown restrictions in England are further relaxed to allow nail bars, beauty salons and tattoo parlours to open. (Photo by Paul ELLIS / AFP) (Photo by PAUL ELLIS/AFP via Getty Images)
Nail technician Hannah Jones wears a PPE face shield and mask as she paints the nails of customer Lynsey Scott at The Beauty Rooms in Oxton, Birkenhead, north west England on July 13, 2020 as novel coronavirus lockdown restrictions in England are further relaxed to allow nail bars, beauty salons and tattoo parlours to open. (Photo by Paul ELLIS / AFP) (Photo by PAUL ELLIS/AFP via Getty Images)

It's been a while since we've been able to get a fresh manicure from our favourite nail technician but we won't have too much longer to wait according to the coronavirus lockdown roadmap. On 22 Feb., Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced that the personal care sector, which includes beauty salons, nail bars, and hairdressers can reopen as of 12 April.

Beauty salons that are allowed to reopen will follow stricter COVID-19 protocol set out back in July 2020, which includes increased hygiene measures, new appointment systems, and fewer customers, to name a few. Despite the great news about nail salons finally having a reopening date, there's no clear news yet on when mobile nail technicians will be allowed to begin business again.

For nail salons to open on 12 April, Johnson stressed that England's four criteria must be met before the country can move through each phase of the lockdown. These include the vaccine deployment programme continuing successfully, data showing the vaccines are sufficiently effective in reducing hospitalisation and deaths in people who are vaccinated, infection rates not risking a surge in hospitalisations putting an unsustainable pressure on the NHS, and the risk assessment not changing by the new variants of concern.