Where to Watch This Week’s New Movies, from ‘Dumb Money’ to ‘Cassandro’

With Telluride and Venice behind us, TIFF wrapping up, and NYFF still a ways off, it’s time for one of our favorite exercises around IndieWire’s where-to-watch guide parts: building your own festival at home (and/or your local multiplex). This week? A surprisingly varied mini-fest is at your fingertips.

If you are in New York or Los Angeles, you can kick off with Craig Gillespie’s fact-based crowdpleaser “Dumb Money,” which just premiered at TIFF (elsewhere in the country? never fear, the film expands over the coming weeks, care of a classic platform release) to get things going. Then take in Bethann Hardison and Frédéric Tcheng’s riveting documentary about boundary-breaking model Hardison, “Invisible Beauty.” Wrap it up with Roger Ross Williams’ “Cassandro,” which combines both the stand-up-and-cheer feelings of your first film with the wow-I-can’t-believe-I-didn’t-know-this factor of the second, all thanks to Gael García Bernal as the real-life amateur luchador Saúl Armendáriz.

More from IndieWire

Each film is now available in a theater near you or in the comfort of your own home (or, in some cases, both, the convenience of it all). Browse your options below.

Week of September 11 – September 17

New Films in Theaters

“Cassandro” (directed by Roger Ross Williams)
Distributor: 
Amazon Studios
Where to Find It:
 Select theaters, plus streaming on Prime Video on September 22

At once hypermasculine and flamboyant, Mexican lucha libre has for long been a popular form of entertainment for the masses. In this larger-than-life performance of testosterone-fueled fracas, of bodies flying through the air, choreographed uppercuts, and arranged victories; the emergence of gay wrestler Saúl Armendáriz (stage name: Cassandro) in the 1980s, came as a shockwave against homophobia.

Arbendáriz’s inspirational life story had previously been told by director Roger Ross Williams in his 2016 documentary short “The Man Without a Mask.” Later, the 2018 non-fiction feature “Cassandro, The Exotico!” tackled not only his rise to fame but the bodily injuries he sustained over nearly three decades of fights. This year’s fabulous retelling, “Cassandro,” Ross Williams’ first narrative outing, stars an irresistible Gael García Bernal as the real-life amateur luchador from in El Paso, Texas turned unexpected beacon of change.

Skepticism about documentary filmmakers crossing over to fiction, especially in a project largely in a language not their own with a myriad of culturally specific traits, is justified; but “Cassandro” results in an impressive transition for Ross Williams, as well as co-writer with David Teague, whose previous credits were predominantly as an editor. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Plus: Read IndieWire’s interviews with star Gael García Bernal.

"Cassandro"
“Cassandro”Courtesy of Prime Video

“Dumb Money” (directed by Craig Gillespie)
Distributor:
 Sony
Where to Find It: Limited theaters, followed by expansion on September 22 and September 29

At once a rowdy comedy and a weirdly affecting tale of working class solidarity, “Dumb Money” is perhaps the best period piece ever made about a period that just happened. The movie, directed by Craig Gillespie in full-on comedy mode, takes us all the way back to the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, when a cast of individual investors took on Wall Street with nothing but a few dollars and an unwavering sense of team spirit.

It feels almost silly to recount the broad strokes of the narrative, given how recently we all lived through it. The time was 2020. The stock was GameStop. The hero was a cat person live-streaming out of his basement. It’s difficult to imagine a viewer going into this story entirely blind. But unlike many ripped-from-the-headlines movies, “Dumb Money,” which plays like “The Big Short” for underdogs, has no trouble justifying its existence, even if stylistic choices sometimes short-change the complexity of its source material. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Plus: Read IndieWire’s interview with director Craig Gillespie and writers Rebecca Angelo and Lauren Schuker Blum.

“A Haunting in Venice” (directed by Kenneth Branagh)
Distributor:
 20th Century Studios
Where to Find It: Theaters

Kenneth Branagh’s Hercule Poirot series — which began with 2017’s “Murder on the Orient Express” and continued with last year’s superior “Death on the Nile” — has emerged as a straightforward alternative for mystery purists turned off by the flashiness of the “Knives Out” films. While Rain Johnson keeps reminding us that murder mysteries are living, breathing entities that can push narrative boundaries and make us laugh and think (while occasionally being too online for their own good), Branagh’s faithful adaptations of Agatha Christie classics function as a control group making the case that the genre was doing just fine for the past century.

Having both franchises running at the same time has benefitted both old and new mystery fans — the world gets to observe Christie’s ongoing influence on pop culture while revisiting her best works. But while Christie’s massive bibliography contains enough quality mysteries to fill several lifetimes of filmmaking, there wasn’t a third novel with comparable obvious name recognition. So Branagh got creative for his third film, taking Christie’s Gothic-tinged mystery “Hallowe’en Party” and moving the setting from England to Italy to make “A Haunting in Venice.” Read IndieWire’s full review.

"A Haunting in Venice"
“A Haunting in Venice”Courtesy of 20th Century

“Invisible Beauty” (directed by Bethann Hardison and Frédéric Tcheng)
Distributor: 
Magnolia Pictures
Where to Find It:
 NYC theaters, with expansion to follow on September 22

Progress in the face of systemic injustice does not occur naturally, it is urged along by sheer force of will — often by one radical visionary. In the case of the fashion industry’s racism, that person is Bethann Hardison. A trailblazing model in the 1970s, she became one of the most important agents of the ’90s, discovering the first male supermodel Tyson Beckford and mentoring Naomi Campbell and Iman. When fickle trends threatened to erase all of her hard work in the aughts, she boldly called out the industry’s blatantly racist casting practices, causing a seismic shift once and for all.

Hardison’s remarkable and fabulous life serves as an inspiring lesson in affecting radical change from within the system, and her methods can be studied thanks to the riveting new documentary “Invisible Beauty.” Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Camp Hideout” (directed by Sean Olson)
Distributor: 
Roadside Attractions
Where to Find It:
 Theaters

“Lift” (directed by David Petersen)
Distributor:
Paramount
Where to Find It:
Select theaters, plus various VOD platforms on September 22

“Mr. Jimmy” (directed by Peter Michael Dowd)
Distributor:
Abramorama
Where to Find It: Select theaters

“The Outlaw Johnny Black” (directed by Michael Jai White)
Distributor: 
Samuel Goldwyn Films
Where to Find It:
 Theaters

“Rebel” (directed by Adil El Arbi and Bilall Fallah)
Distributor:
Yellow Veil Pictures
Where to Find It: Select theaters

“Remembering Every Night” (directed by Yui Kiyohara)
Distributor:
KimStim
Where to Find It: Select theaters, including a special 2-for-1 at NYC’s Film at Lincoln Center

New Films on VOD and Streaming, Including Premium Platforms and Virtual Cinemas

“Love at First Sight” (directed by Vanessa Caswill)
Distributor: 
Netflix
Where to Find It:
 Streaming on Netflix

The mathematics of romance add up to something semi-likable, but definitely not lovable when it comes to Netflix’s latest rom-com “Love at First Sight.” Based on Jennifer E. Smith’s bestselling novel “The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight” and produced by the “To All the Boys” franchise team, the film fumbles in one key area: a disheartening lack of chemistry between lead stars Haley Lu Richardson and Ben Hardy.

The film opens with the always-charming Richardson at an airport (still waiting to board since the finale of “The White Lotus” Season 2?). We already know Richardson can expertly play aloof and eccentric with a spectacular flair after her Emmy-worthy turn in the HBO series, but as Hadley in “Love at First Sight,” Richardson seems as though she’s already been there, done that. Give her a better rom-com role! Read IndieWire’s full review.

"Love at First Sight"
“Love at First Sight”Netflix

Also available this week:

“Donyale Luna: Supermodel” (directed by Nailah Jefferson)
Distributor: 
HBO
Where to Find It:
 Streaming on HBO

“A Million Miles Away” (directed by Alejandra Márquez Abella)
Distributor: 
Amazon Studios
Where to Find It:
 Streaming on Prime Video

Week of September 4 – September 10

New Films in Theaters

“El Conde” (directed by Pablo Larraín)
Distributor: 
Netflix
Where to Find It:
Select theaters, plus streaming on Netflix on September 15

Everyone knows that Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet died in December 2006 at the age of 91, more than 30 years after he seized power from Salvador Allende in a coup d’état that was followed by censorship, torture, mass internments, and forced disappearances at the pleasure of an unelected regime that drained the country of its lifeblood for generations to come. What Pablo Larraín’s cheeky and grotesque “El Conde” (or “The Count”) presupposes is… what if he didn’t?

Directly addressing a figure whose dark shadow has fringed some of the director’s previous work (specifically “No,” “Post Mortem,” and “Tony Manero”), this fanged satire about the persistence of evil imagines that Pinochet is still alive and kicking. Or, more accurately: undead and loathing it. In Larraín’s conception, Pinochet is a 250-year-old vampire who first developed his lust for blood during the French Revolution, during which he so fetishized Marie Antoinette’s indifference towards the common man that he stole the queen’s head and licked the blood off the guillotine that was used to lop it off. From that point on, he traveled the world and fed off oppression wherever he could find it, eventually settling in Chile — “a country without a king” — when the time came to orchestrate his own suffering. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Plus: Read IndieWire’s interview with filmmaker Pablo Larraín.

“My Animal” (directed by Jacqueline Castel)
Distributor: 
Paramount Global Content Distribution
Where to Find It:
Select theaters, plus various digital platforms on September 15

At the outset of “My Animal,” Jacqueline Castel’s uniquely lesbian lycan horror film, an entranced Heather (a tremendous Bobbi Salvör Menuez) sits on her knees in her white nightgown as a television’s gray glow, emanating from the visage of a full moon, envelopes her. The bluish rings under their eyes deepen, blood oozes from her nose, her body contorts, her bones crack, and her tendons twist. Growling, she drags herself across the carpet of her dimmed living room, before springing free, out of her house and through the woods for an immersive reimaging of a werewolf transformation.

And yet, it’s not solely a devoutness to the genre — the thrumming electronic ’80s score, the liquidy gray-scaled images of trees, or the aggressive shaky handheld tracking through the snow-covered forest, that awakens Castel’s film. It’s the “Beauty and the Beast” episode of the Shelly Duvall hosted series “Faerie Tale Theatre,” that Heather was watching on her television, which grounds us in the charged sensual and aching sexual politics of Castel’s vision. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“My Big Fat Greek Wedding 3” (directed by Nia Vardalos)
Distributor: 
Focus Features
Where to Find It:
Theaters

Back in 2002, “My Big Fat Greek Wedding” introduced mainstream audiences to all the heartwarming moments, overbearing relatives, and downright craziness of coming from a large Greek-American family. Somehow, Nia Vardalos’ breakout rom-com spurred a two-decade-long trilogy; sadly, the third installment relies too heavily on its stunning Corfu scenery instead of an actual plot.

This is Vardalos’ first time in the director’s chair for the trilogy that she penned; “My Big Fat Greek Wedding 3” is also Vardalos’ sophomore directorial effort overall. It shows. Jokes fall flat while attempts at seriousness (references to Alzheimer’s, the spreading of ashes, xenophobia — you know, the stuff heavier than Aunt Toula’s tray of baklava) are downright hilarious in their off-tone delivery. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Nun II” (directed by Michael Chaves)
Distributor: 
Warner Bros.
Where to Find It:
Theaters

Like a startlingly funny sermon delivered by your parish’s creepiest priest, “The Nun II” will leave you smiling despite yourself. Director Michael Chaves (“The Curse of La Llorona,” “The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It”) helms this surprisingly clever ninth installment in The Conjuring Universe, and his third at-bat for the horror franchise created by James Wan just over a decade ago. With a story by recent genre genius Akela Cooper (“Malignant,” “M3GAN”) — and a script co-written by her, Ian Goldberg, and Richard Naing (“The Autopsy of Jane Doe”) — this smartly crafted sequel-to-a-prequel marks a long-awaited upswing for Warner Bros.’ steadily declining demonology epic.

The exposition-heavy whodunit isn’t much scarier than past installments, and it may not mark a permanent about-face for a franchise that’s been struggling since “Annabelle: Creation” (2017). But “The Nun II” proves an invigorating Second Coming for the returning cast painfully let down by the first “The Nun” (2018) — and a redemptive triumph for The Conjuring’s merciless Mother Superior, portrayed once again by the devilishly divine Bonnie Aarons. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Rotting in the Sun” (directed by Sebastián Silva)
Distributor: 
MUBI
Where to Find It:
Select theaters

Sebastián Silva has suicide on the brain in “Rotting in the Sun,” his eighth directorial feature and one in which he also plays himself. Sebastián is living in Mexico City, running out of money, addicted to ketamine, and bereft of creative ideas. But he faces a new, potentially soul-eroding opportunity when flippant gay internet persona and content creator Jordan Firstman enters the frame. Firstman also plays himself in a performance that interrogates his image as a contemporary queer icon while also mocking it — in ways self-aware and also not — in this raunchy, sexually explicit lambasting of gay male life whose target audience will both revile and revere this film.

“Rotting in the Sun” begins with Sebastián sitting at a public fountain in the Plaza Rio de Janeiro, googling “how to kill yourself in Mexico.” His dog, Chima, is eating a pile of fresh human shit off the ground. Sebastian is meanwhile reading E. M. Cioran’s philosophy text “The Trouble with Being Born,” which argues that birth, not death, is the ultimate “laughable accident” but that any attempt at suicide is already too belated. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Plus: Read IndieWire’s interview with filmmaker and star Sebastián Silva and star Jordan Firstman.

Also available this week:

“Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe” (directed by Aitch Alberto)
Distributor: 
Blue Fox Entertainment
Where to Find It:
Select theaters

“Good Boy” (directed by Viljar Bøe)
Distributor: 
Saban Films
Where to Find It:
Select theaters, plus various digital and VOD platforms

New Films on VOD and Streaming, Including Premium Platforms and Virtual Cinemas

“Self Reliance” (directed by Jake Johnson)
Distributor: 
Hulu
Where to Find It:
Streaming on Hulu

Jake Johnson makes his feature directorial debut with “Self Reliance,” a comedy with a fascinating premise and an opening act that provides equal thrills and laughs. Unfortunately, while Johnson’s script shows promise, the actor/writer-turned-director squanders it with a lack of strong vision, and a rom-com element that makes the film lose focus, and also most laughs.

What if you take David Fincher’s “The Game,” but run it through The Lonely Island’s comedy filter? That’d get you close to “Self Reliance,” which starts strong but loses itself in an attempt to juggle too many tones at once. We meet Johnson’s protagonist, Tom, a man conforming to a sad routine he repeats every single day. He goes to the same bar, watches the same cowboy movies, and repeatedly tries and fails to knock on his ex-girlfriend’s door to ask her why she suddenly broke up with him. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Portrait of the Queen” (directed by Fabrizio Ferri)
Distributor: 
VMI Worldwide
Where to Find It:
Various digital platforms

“Scouts Honor: The Secret Files of the Boy Scouts of America” (directed by Brian Knappenberger)
Distributor:
Netflix
Where to Find It:
Streaming on Netflix

Week of August 28 – September 3

New Films in Theaters

“The Equalizer 3” (directed by Antoine Fuqua)
Distributor: 
Sony
Where to Find It:
Theaters

To enjoy the (allegedly) final entry in Antoine Fuqua’s “The Equalizer” trilogy, it’s not at all crucial to understand the particulars of how former Marine and intelligence operative Robert McCall (Denzel Washington) lands in Italy for this latest outing. It’s safe to assume the vigilante is there to kick some bad-dude butt, with more convoluted revelations to come. Wherever Robert McCall lands, even a luxurious private winery, there are villains afoot for him to kill off in the most gruesome manners, details be damned.

And “The Equalizer 3” opens with Robert skulking around said winery, offing dark-clad mercenary types, and apparently setting right some sort of horrible injustice. As we might expect, he gets much more than he bargained for — and so will fans of Fuqua’s brutal action series, which closes out in fine style. His foray into Italy begins with snappy, bloody vignettes, putting both Robert and the audience on an awkward foot, all in service to jetting him to Europe.

And that’s before Robert gets shot by the most unlikely of aggressors, yet still manages to get away (not just on foot, but also by car and then even a ferry). When he comes to, a kind-hearted Italian cop is there to assist, shuffling the dazed (and bleeding out) Robert to a kind-hearted Italian doctor, who happily volunteers to take the injured stranger into his care (and his life in, you guessed it, a stunning Italian village primarily populated by kind-hearted people). Read IndieWire’s full review.

Plus: Read IndieWire’s interview with director Antoine Fuqua.

“Perpetrator” (directed by Jennifer Reeder)
Distributor: 
Shudder
Where to Find It:
Select theaters, streaming on Shudder

Even in the golden age of highbrow auteur horror, truly cutting feminist horror is still waiting for its “Get Out” moment. That’s not for lack of trying: Rape revenge thrillers were trendy before the tepid pop feminism of “Promising Young Woman” made them a staple of the sub-genre.

While feminist horror provocateur Jennifer Reeder (“Knives and Skin”) has tastes far more sinister and far less mainstream, her latest zany invention is an ambitious but uneven jumble of ideas. One part surreal coming of age horror, one part to-catch-a-predator thriller, “Perpetrator” suffers from a novice lead performance and a script that tries to do too much. It’s an ambitious addition to the feminist horror genre with blood and guts to spare, but it’s no game-changer. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Plus: Read IndieWire’s interview with filmmaker Jennifer Reeder and star Alicia Silverstone.

Also available this week:

“All Fun and Games” (directed by Eren Celeboglu and Ari Costa)
Distributor: 
Vertical
Where to Find It:
Theaters, plus various VOD platforms

“The Good Mother” (directed by Miles Joris-Peyrafitte)
Distributor: 
Vertical
Where to Find It:
Theaters

New Films on VOD and Streaming, Including Premium Platforms and Virtual Cinemas

Also available this week:

“Choose Love” (directed by Stuart McDonald)
Distributor: 
Netflix
Where to Find It:
Streaming on Netflix

Week of August 21 – August 27

New Films in Theaters

“Bottoms” (directed by Emma Seligman) — IndieWire Critic’s Pick
Distributor: 
MGM
Where to Find It:
Select theaters, with expansion to follow

The easiest way to describe Emma Seligman’s sophomore feature, “Bottoms”? It’s hilariously weird. Director Seligman and star Rachel Sennott reunite in their follow-up to “Shiva Baby,” taking as hard a pivot from their 2020 breakout (and a script they co-wrote) as they come.

This is a queer teen sex comedy that wears its influences on its sleeve, yet still resembles no other film. It cements Seligman and Sennott as two of the most exciting young voices in cinema today, delivering a hit in the making with a tone that brings movies like “Wet Hot American Summer” and “Not Another Teen Movie” to a whole new generation.

This is a film set in a weird, parallel world with almost cartoon-like logic, a world heightened to the point of self-serious parody, where the high school’s biggest jock-himbo has his face plastered on every surface of the school and there is a giant mural of himself as Adam in “The Creation of Adam” adorning the cafeteria, a world where the feminism teacher openly reads a nude magazine called “Divorced and Happy” during class — he’s played by Marshawn Lynch, a highlight of the movie. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Plus: Read IndieWire’s interview with director and co-writer Emma Seligman and star and co-writer Rachel Sennott.

“Fremont” (directed by Babak Jalali)
Distributor: 
Music Box Films
Where to Find It:
Select theaters

A former translator for American troops in Kabul — a role that eventually allowed her to leave her birth country but left her with unresolved feelings of guilt and shame — twenty-something Donya now lives by herself in a Fremont, California, apartment complex full of other Afghan immigrants. Whatever sense of community Donya gets from the other people in the building doesn’t seem to alleviate her quiet isolation, even if neighbors like Suleyman (Timur Nusratty) and Salim (Siddique Ahmed) are readily available for wistful conversation at all hours of the night.

When the sun comes up, Donya commutes to her job at a Chinese-owned fortune cookie factory, where she’s responsible for printing out the cryptic sayings that other people will eventually translate for themselves. That might prove to be a good fit for a young girl in a foreign land who, despite her fluency in the native tongue, feels like she’s no longer in conversation with the world around her. As the cookie puts it: “Now is a good time to explore.” Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Golda” (directed by Guy Nattiv)
Distributor: 
Bleecker Street
Where to Find It:
Theaters

Defending her conduct during the Yom Kippur War before a panel of graying men, Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir (Helen Mirren) takes the half-smoked cigarette already dangling from her lips and, instinctually but not all absentmindedly, uses it to light another. This idiosyncratic character beat arrives early in Guy Nattiv’s ho-hum biopic, and speaks volumes about story and subject, telling all you need to know about Meir the person and “Golda” the film.

In theory a docudrama reliving the 1973 Yom Kippur War from the perch of power, “Golda” is, in practice, a compendium of actorly affects, a spotlight on a venerable performer offering them a stage on which to shine. Pushed and pulled between conflicting tonal and narrative approaches, Nattiv’s film finds its clearest identity as an awards bait corollary to a hacky stand-up bit: What if they made the whole plane out of the black box? What if they made the whole film out of the Oscar reel? Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Gran Turismo” (directed by Neill Blomkamp)
Distributor: 
Sony
Where to Find It:
Theaters

After taking on apartheid and economic inequality with “District 9” and “Elysium,” Neill Blomkamp was finally prepared to make a film about the world’s most oppressed social class: gamers. Rather than a straight adaptation of the video game that shares its name, “Gran Turismo” is a celebration of the people who play it. It’s a pious ode to Sony’s wondrous PlayStation system (anyone with even the slightest grievances with “Air” or “Blackberry” should steer clear of this one), and a grating middle finger to anyone who dares suggest that the answers to a gamer’s problems might lie outside the “Call of Duty” lobby.

It’s also a thrilling retelling of one of the craziest stories in recent sports history, shot with the level of skillful spectacle that the source material demands. Blomkamp might have directed the best 90-minute sports movie of the decade — it’s just a shame that “Gran Turismo” is nearly two and a half hours. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Our Father, the Devil” (directed by Ellie Foumbi) — IndieWire Critic’s Pick
Distributor: 
Cineverse
Where to Find It:
Select theaters

There are no atheists in foxholes and — generally speaking — there are no grifters in gimp bondage. Critics of contemporary Christianity are quick to point out that sects of the faith are filled with so-called “priests” who lie, scam, embezzle, and abuse their followers in the name of enriching themselves. But tie one of them up and threaten to kill him and you’ll see his true nature revealed. Anyone who keeps preaching their Biblical virtues when their physical safety is on the line is probably sincere about it.

That uncomfortable fact becomes apparent to Marie (Babetida Sadjo) when she kidnaps the man who haunts her dreams in “Our Father, the Devil.” Despite a brutal childhood in war-torn Africa, Marie has built a respectable life for herself as the head chef at an upscale French nursing home. But when the seemingly perfect Father Patrick (Souléymane Sy Savané) arrives and starts preaching to her affluent residents, she instantly recognizes him as the warlord who killed her parents, burned her village, and repeatedly raped her after forcing her to join his militia. He might have changed his name and hidden his scars, but she’d recognize his eyes and unusual eating habits anywhere. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Piaffe” (directed by Ann Oren) — IndieWire Critic’s Pick
Distributor: 
Oscilloscope
Where to Find It:
Select theaters

Using sci-fi to create a sexual allegory is a staple of body horror genre, just ask David Cronenberg. Now, let us introduce the body pleasure genre. No, not porn, but a character-driven drama in which personal and sexual growth synthesise in the name of erotic cinema.

Visual artist Ann Oren’s debut feature “Piaffe” fits this exact mold, following a meek introvert in Berlin who grows a horse’s tail and has a sexual awakening. Oren’s teasing style is the perfect route into the story. Shooting on 16mm, she mounts every scene by slowly, surely feeding in key details. In other words: she has a gift for both horseplay and foreplay. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Plus: Read IndieWire’s interview with filmmaker Ann Oren.

“Scrapper” (directed by Charlotte Regan)
Distributor: 
Kino Lorber
Where to Find It:
Select theaters

From Pitsea railway station in south-central Essex, around 15 miles from London, you can get to a lot of places. Trains go to industrial port Tilbury further south, seaside paradise Southend to the east (admittedly: my home), and of course the Big Smoke a few minutes west. Georgie (newcomer Lola Campbell), a 12-year-old girl motoring through the stages of grief since losing her mom to an unspecified illness, couldn’t care less. The cookie-cutter estate where Georgie lives, all alone, is everything she needs.

Debutant director Charlotte Regan and DP Molly Manning Walker make it feel like all Earth is there. Georgie’s self-contained world matches up with a fierce self-sufficiency. Her primary caregiver, aside from fictional uncle “Winston Churchill,” is Georgie. Even with Britain’s notoriously stretched public services, children are not supposed to live alone. Then dad Jason (Harris Dickinson) leaps over the back fence and into Georgie’s life for the first time. Returning from Ibiza, where he worked as a club promoter and (presumably) a lookalike for English soccer star Phil Foden, Jason is ready for the next phase of his life: fatherhood. Or so he thinks. What happens when your child has ideas of their own? Read IndieWire’s full review.

Plus: Read IndieWire’s interview with filmmaker Charlotte Regan.

Also available this week:

“The Dive” (directed by Max Erlenwein)
Distributor: 
RLJE Films
Where to Find It:
Theaters

“The Issue with Tissue – a boreal love story” (directed by Michael Zelniker)
Distributor: 
FilmOption International
Where to Find It:
Limited theaters

“Retribution” (directed by Nimród Antal)
Distributor: 
Lionsgate
Where to Find It:
Theaters

New Films on VOD and Streaming, Including Premium Platforms and Virtual Cinemas

“Mob Land” (directed by Nicholas Maggio)
Distributor: 
Saban Films
Where to Find It:
Various VOD and digital platforms

One thing is clear after watching “Mob Land”: Kevin Dillon will not be the man to end America’s opioid crisis. In fact, it’s possible that the prescription drug epidemic currently gutting this country will not end at the hands of anysingle “Entourage” cast member.

The man formerly known as Johnny Drama stars in the film as Trey, a reckless drifter whose lime green Japanese sports car raises plenty of eyebrows in his small MAGA town. But despite his life of petty crime and general inability to get his act together, Trey has a few thoughts about the opioids that have begun circulating through his town at an alarming rate. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“You Are So Not Invited to My Bat Mitzvah” (directed by Sammi Cohen)
Distributor: 
Netflix
Where to Find It:
Streaming on Netflix

Adam Sandler long ago perfected the art of working with his friends (from David Spade and Rob Schneider to Allen Covert and Nick Swardson, Sandler found his people when he was a rising star, and he’s stuck with him). So what’s next? Now, he’s taking that same approach of working with people he already knows and loves to generate a platform, through his Happy Madison production shingle and streaming giant Netflix, for his own daughters Sunny and Sadie Sandler to shine.

Is it still nepotism if it’s this blatant? Probably — but in an added twist, Sandler’s choice to bolster his daughters comes with a pleasant surprise: it works, and well. Directed by Sammi Cohen, this new entry in the Sandler-family-business model, “You Are So Not Invited to My Bat Mitzvah” is an endearing take on the coming-of-age tween film, with a heavy dose of religion — in the best way. Sunny Sandler stars as Stacy, a sweet 13-year-old who dreams of a blow-out bash bat mitzvah, one heavy on the New York City influences and LMFAO bangers, very light on the Torah. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Wayne Shorter: Zero Gravity” (directed by Dorsay Alavi)
Distributor: 
Prime Video
Where to Find It:
Streaming on Prime Video

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