Mourners come together to help gardeners remove plastic from tribute bouquets

·2-min read
Photo credit: Richard Baker - Getty Images
Photo credit: Richard Baker - Getty Images

Thousands of mourners have paid their respects to Queen Elizabeth II outside Buckingham Palace, following her passing on Thursday 8th September 2022.

As the nation enters the official mourning period, piles of flowers have been building up at the memorial flower garden in Green Park, London. To help the park's gardeners and keep the flowers looking fresh for as long as possible, mourners have come together to carefully remove the plastic wrapping from the tribute bouquets.

The move follows an official statement from The Royal Parks asking vistors to remove any wrapping from flowers before they are laid. The post reads: "Visitors are invited to leave floral tributes at a dedicated site in The Green Park.

"You will be asked to remove wrappings from floral tributes. Please consider arriving with the wrapping already removed. Bins will be provided for those unable to do so. You are respectfully asked not to lay tributes outside of the official floral tribute site. Removing the wrapping will aid the longevity of the flowers and will assist in subsequent composting which will start between one week and a fortnight after the date of the funeral."

Photo credit: Richard Baker - Getty Images
Photo credit: Richard Baker - Getty Images

The flowers left outside Buckingham Palace, which will be turned into compost for royal gardens, will be sensitively moved at the end of each day to the Green Park tribute site. If you want to pay your respects with flowers, make sure you remove any plastic wrapping and avoid adding additional items, such as teddy bears. You can also send a message on condolence to the Royal Family via the official website.

"Any form of floral tribute is acceptable. In the interests of sustainability, we ask visitors to only lay organic or compostable material. We would prefer visitors not to bring non-floral objects/artefacts such as teddy bears or balloons."

Photo credit: Richard Baker - Getty Images
Photo credit: Richard Baker - Getty Images

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