Money Diary: A Museum Supervisor In Lancashire On 23k

·22-min read

Welcome to Money Diaries, where we're tackling what might be the last taboo facing modern working women: money. We're asking a cross-section of women how they spend their hard-earned money during a seven-day period – and we're tracking every last penny.

This week: "I'm a 25-year-old museum worker living in Lancashire. I graduated from my master's last year and have a part-time contract at a local museum as the supervisor. This is honestly my dream job because in the museum world it is very hard to get up the ladder and secure a permanent contract. The rest of the time I'm a community heritage freelancer. This was initially to make up for the part-time hours but it’s slowly developing into a consistent revenue stream. I've done so much already, from helping parishes with archaeology planning to taking on set projects and giving talks to local groups. I've always worried about finances and the fact I can do all of this and actually make money, instead of volunteering, is crazy to me.

I create budgets but they vary each month because of my freelance work and picking up extra shifts, which is a little confusing and means my income is always fluctuating. My current system means my set expenses are covered by my permanent contract and any savings come from the freelance work. At the moment I am living with my fiancé's family while we save for our first house, which has been a godsend as neither of us had jobs during the pandemic. I feel privileged to be able to put all my efforts into saving thanks to amazing family renting rates."

Occupation: Museum supervisor and freelancer
Industry: Museums
Age: 25
Location: Lancashire 
Salary: £23k (varies depending on freelance work).
Paycheque amount: £1,600 after tax and pension for both my part-time job and freelance. This varies each month depending on freelance work. 
Number of housemates: Four (my fiancé, his parents and his sister) plus two doggos.
Pronouns: She/her

Monthly Expenses 

Housing costs: £300 rent.
Loan payments: None.
Savings? £20k in various funds and ISAs. 
Utilities: Covered in housing costs.
Pension? For my museum job I have a pension that I pay 5% into each month. I also have a lifetime ISA, which can only be spent on your first house or retirement, meaning any money I put into that will in theory go towards my retirement. 
All other monthly payments: £64 car insurance, £8 phone bill, £30 per month saved for car maintenance and servicing because I drive a lot of miles. Subscriptions: Disney+ £7. 

Did you participate in any form of higher education? If yes, how did you pay for it?

I went to university and completed my bachelor's degree and then did a part-time master's degree while I worked. I paid for these via student loans and maintenance loans. I did manage to get a discount by staying at the same university for my master's. My mum helped for the first two years but she slowly stopped volunteering money for rent since I had a part-time job, and my master's I did off my own bat. 

Growing up, what kind of conversations did you have about money?

My family loves bargains! Accounting for every penny was instilled in me. We never formally talked about money, we always had enough even after my parents divorced so I didn’t think too much about it. The family motto of 'spend some, save some' has really stuck with me and is one of the reasons I have been able to save so much even through uni and my first proper job. We are now very open about money and I would say my education is ongoing after entering the real world of work and being slightly self-employed. 

If you have, when did you move out of your parents'/guardians' house? 

I moved out when I went to university. I then moved in with my partner's family because of COVID and we have stayed so we can get our first house. 

At what age did you become financially responsible for yourself? Does anyone else cover any aspects of your financial life? 

I would say I became financially independent at 21. This was after a discussion with my mum about doing my master's and I knew I would be covering everything for myself after graduating from my bachelor's. I suppose living with my partner's family is helping but this is a choice we have made since we could technically afford a rented flat in our home town if we wanted. 

What was your first job and why did you get it? 

My first job was as a waitress at the local pub at the age of 16. It came at a great time and helped me pay for my fancy phone contract and driving lessons during college. 

Do you worry about money now? 

My worries with money vary depending on my stress level, which I think everyone can relate to. On one hand I never thought I could land my dream job in my industry and get to work on amazing projects as a freelancer as well! But on the other hand I understand it is classed as a graduate wage. I would like to earn more and not have the general worries of being a freelancer to deal with. I will say this worry has drastically reduced now my fiancé has got his first proper job after retraining during lockdown. This also means my expenses have gone down since we split our joint expenses – just the food shop, subscriptions and a bit of petrol money but it all adds up. 

Do you or have you ever received passive or inherited income? If yes, please explain. 

I was fortunate enough to receive £5k from my mother when I turned 18. I was told I could use the money however I wanted but my mum had always envisioned it being used as a deposit on a house. Of course most deposits cost more nowadays so I decided to put it into stocks and shares. I will use most of this towards the house deposit and moving costs but keep some in the account. 

Refinery29 is currently looking for someone who has a NatWest ‘Buy Now Pay Later’ card to take part in a paid opportunity around R29's Money Diaries. This person would need to be a conscious spender and saving up for or considering making a large purchase (£500 and under). If this sounds like something you would be interested in, please do send a bit of information about yourself and your financial situation to moneydiary@refinery29.uk.

<strong>Day One </strong><br><br>6.45am: It is Monday and that means I need to set off early. In my weird museum job I am actually split between two museums and have set days at each so it is super important I keep track of the days and any extra shifts I work. Today's site means I need to start at 8.30am and also means I need to set off really soon! I hate mornings and prepare everything the night before so I can snooze 'til the last second. <br><br>12.45pm: We don’t have a set lunchtime at this museum because we aren’t open to the public on the days I work. My job involves a lot of things but mainly making sure the museum checks – fire systems, building condition and objects – are done. Today I am running a little late and apologise on the radios to my work bestie and we grab our packed lunches. <br><br>6pm: Get home and my fiancé, M, and I head straight to the gym. I usually do some sort of workout for 15 minutes and then run on the treadmill for 35 minutes. We have a sort of home gym that has the family's collections of weights, M’s bench, a treadmill and an elliptical machine. I vowed I would never pay for exercise so I took up running a few years ago and having the treadmill means I can run when the weather is rubbish. Today I have a really good run and go shower, leaving M to his weights, the weirdo.<br><br>7pm: I set to work making tea, which is yummy. While it is simmering I make my packed lunch for tomorrow. <br><br>7.30pm: I binge our latest anime with M and check my diary for the week including freelance emails to try and make my life a little easier come Wednesday. <br><br>10pm: Sleep.<br><br><strong>Total: £0</strong>
Day One

6.45am: It is Monday and that means I need to set off early. In my weird museum job I am actually split between two museums and have set days at each so it is super important I keep track of the days and any extra shifts I work. Today's site means I need to start at 8.30am and also means I need to set off really soon! I hate mornings and prepare everything the night before so I can snooze 'til the last second.

12.45pm: We don’t have a set lunchtime at this museum because we aren’t open to the public on the days I work. My job involves a lot of things but mainly making sure the museum checks – fire systems, building condition and objects – are done. Today I am running a little late and apologise on the radios to my work bestie and we grab our packed lunches.

6pm: Get home and my fiancé, M, and I head straight to the gym. I usually do some sort of workout for 15 minutes and then run on the treadmill for 35 minutes. We have a sort of home gym that has the family's collections of weights, M’s bench, a treadmill and an elliptical machine. I vowed I would never pay for exercise so I took up running a few years ago and having the treadmill means I can run when the weather is rubbish. Today I have a really good run and go shower, leaving M to his weights, the weirdo.

7pm: I set to work making tea, which is yummy. While it is simmering I make my packed lunch for tomorrow.

7.30pm: I binge our latest anime with M and check my diary for the week including freelance emails to try and make my life a little easier come Wednesday.

10pm: Sleep.

Total: £0
<strong>Day Two </strong><br><br>6.45am: Another early morning. I drag myself out of bed and scramble into my uniform and grab my things. I have this down to an art and get in the car and on the way to work by 7.25am. <br><br>8.30am: I arrive at work and am immediately greeted with work. The role I do at this site means I do a lot of health and safety, staff training, inductions, dealing with contractors, checking the museum collections and (if I have time) social media. This means I am constantly arranging things and walking around the buildings with people. <br><br>1pm: Head for a later lunchtime and get my work buddy to fill me in on her day. Lunch is cut in half when I need to answer the door to let some contractors out. There is never a dull moment. <br><br>2pm: I need to walk the museum and grounds to do one of my many checks on the building. In the middle of the museum we have a pond and viaduct area that needs looking over. It is very beautiful and peaceful and gives me a bit of time to reflect and keep track of everything. I only work two days at this museum so I write a to-do list on my phone and walk back to the office and bash my emails. <br><br>5pm: I finish a bit early due to our lone working rules so I decide to drive to Boots and pick up a few essentials (I desperately need some vitamins and skincare). M pays for his half and mine comes to £3.49 with discounts. Thank you, Boots advantage card!<br><br>6pm: My evening routine consists of the same workout running session, shower and making tea. I then prep my packed lunch, which has become a weird sort of ritual. I quite enjoy it as I feel like it means I am officially finished for the day. <br><br>7.30pm: Begin my evening of phone calls. My mother always calls at this time of the week and then I proceed to call my younger brother for a weekly catch-up. My brother has auditory perspective disorder and a few other diagnoses, from dyslexia to autism, which means he hates phone calls and talking to people in general. We do actually have a lot in common and in general I can get him to talk more than my parents can about what's going on. Because he has just got his first ‘proper’ job he is living with our grandmother to keep her company and start leading an independent life.<br><br>9.45pm: I look at my calendar and prepare my bag and outfit for tomorrow as it is a freelance day. I then head up to bed to start reading my book and leave M to his gaming session with his friends. My book is actually archaeological for once, a new nonfiction book on burials, so I get a few chapters in. I definitely find that in heritage and archaeology you need to read around your subject and sector to keep up with legislative changes, new digs, finds and other bits that might become relevant. <br><br>10.30pm: Sleep.<br><br><strong>Total: £3.49</strong>
Day Two

6.45am: Another early morning. I drag myself out of bed and scramble into my uniform and grab my things. I have this down to an art and get in the car and on the way to work by 7.25am.

8.30am: I arrive at work and am immediately greeted with work. The role I do at this site means I do a lot of health and safety, staff training, inductions, dealing with contractors, checking the museum collections and (if I have time) social media. This means I am constantly arranging things and walking around the buildings with people.

1pm: Head for a later lunchtime and get my work buddy to fill me in on her day. Lunch is cut in half when I need to answer the door to let some contractors out. There is never a dull moment.

2pm: I need to walk the museum and grounds to do one of my many checks on the building. In the middle of the museum we have a pond and viaduct area that needs looking over. It is very beautiful and peaceful and gives me a bit of time to reflect and keep track of everything. I only work two days at this museum so I write a to-do list on my phone and walk back to the office and bash my emails.

5pm: I finish a bit early due to our lone working rules so I decide to drive to Boots and pick up a few essentials (I desperately need some vitamins and skincare). M pays for his half and mine comes to £3.49 with discounts. Thank you, Boots advantage card!

6pm: My evening routine consists of the same workout running session, shower and making tea. I then prep my packed lunch, which has become a weird sort of ritual. I quite enjoy it as I feel like it means I am officially finished for the day.

7.30pm: Begin my evening of phone calls. My mother always calls at this time of the week and then I proceed to call my younger brother for a weekly catch-up. My brother has auditory perspective disorder and a few other diagnoses, from dyslexia to autism, which means he hates phone calls and talking to people in general. We do actually have a lot in common and in general I can get him to talk more than my parents can about what's going on. Because he has just got his first ‘proper’ job he is living with our grandmother to keep her company and start leading an independent life.

9.45pm: I look at my calendar and prepare my bag and outfit for tomorrow as it is a freelance day. I then head up to bed to start reading my book and leave M to his gaming session with his friends. My book is actually archaeological for once, a new nonfiction book on burials, so I get a few chapters in. I definitely find that in heritage and archaeology you need to read around your subject and sector to keep up with legislative changes, new digs, finds and other bits that might become relevant.

10.30pm: Sleep.

Total: £3.49
<strong>Day Three </strong><br><br>8am: I relish the morning rest that my freelance days – or what M has coined my 'freedom days' – bring. Today is a busy day but instead of working from home I am off to town for one of the archaeology events I am organising. <br><br>8.20am: M's parents invite me on their morning dog walk and offer an exchange of dropping me into town. I take everything with me and grab my walking boots. The two doggos love to walk with another person and I chat with M's parents about general life and how their respective jobs are going. <br><br>9.20am: I'm somehow super early! I wander a little further into town and decide to use my Caffè Nero voucher on an iced decaf oat latte. Don't judge! Caffeine makes me crazy and I am lactose-intolerant so my orders are always a bit extra. <br><br>9.30am: I start up my laptop and prepare a few drafts, triple-checking today's agenda. Among other things my freelance work includes arranging monthly archaeology events. I'm also working to help organise and promote an archaeological community dig we are funding next month and get the joyous news we are fully booked! <br><br>10.10am: As I'm waiting for today's event I receive a weird email from PayPal saying I have paid a transaction of £80. I panic a little and triple-check my accounts, discovering it is a stupid antivirus software I signed up to last year on a deal to try it compared to our usual. I enquire about a refund since I'm pretty convinced I didn't receive any emails about the charge.<br><br>10.20am: Everyone arrives and we head to our first session. It turns out to be really insightful for everyone who attends. <br><br>1pm: I eat my packed lunch while we all chat and purchase a tea before our next session since I am aware we won't be offered refreshments at the archives. £2<br><br>4pm: Our day is over and I wish everyone farewell before I head home. Most freelance days involve a LOT of driving for archaeological walks, different libraries, different sites and group visits along with different places for meetings. So I usually drive home, do my usual routine and finish my day off slowly in the evening. But not today! I catch up on all the work and even sneak in some emails about my next freelance project. I will say, although I don’t want to be a freelancer forever I am amazed that my niche heritage and archaeology work is attracting attention. <br><br>5.10pm: I finish up and walk to the bus station and pay £2 for the single trip. The bus is pretty loud and full but we live too far away to realistically walk so the purchase was needed. <br><br>5.40pm: Get home and set myself up for my evening routine while chatting with M. After my run, I shower and start making tea. I am nothing if not a creature of habit. <br><br>7pm: I use my evening to catch up with friends, bulk messaging people, checking replies and video chat with my bestie while I crochet. I'm learning to be content with the social life I currently have, which is probably a weird thing to say. We lived in York before the pandemic and I had a bunch of friends who I would see weekly for a pint, food or walk around the city. I'm slowly making friends again back in Lancashire but working far away also means new work friends aren't around the corner. <br><br>11pm: My refund came through for the software! It pays to be quick and call the centre. <br><br><strong>Total: £4</strong>
Day Three

8am: I relish the morning rest that my freelance days – or what M has coined my 'freedom days' – bring. Today is a busy day but instead of working from home I am off to town for one of the archaeology events I am organising.

8.20am: M's parents invite me on their morning dog walk and offer an exchange of dropping me into town. I take everything with me and grab my walking boots. The two doggos love to walk with another person and I chat with M's parents about general life and how their respective jobs are going.

9.20am: I'm somehow super early! I wander a little further into town and decide to use my Caffè Nero voucher on an iced decaf oat latte. Don't judge! Caffeine makes me crazy and I am lactose-intolerant so my orders are always a bit extra.

9.30am: I start up my laptop and prepare a few drafts, triple-checking today's agenda. Among other things my freelance work includes arranging monthly archaeology events. I'm also working to help organise and promote an archaeological community dig we are funding next month and get the joyous news we are fully booked!

10.10am: As I'm waiting for today's event I receive a weird email from PayPal saying I have paid a transaction of £80. I panic a little and triple-check my accounts, discovering it is a stupid antivirus software I signed up to last year on a deal to try it compared to our usual. I enquire about a refund since I'm pretty convinced I didn't receive any emails about the charge.

10.20am: Everyone arrives and we head to our first session. It turns out to be really insightful for everyone who attends.

1pm: I eat my packed lunch while we all chat and purchase a tea before our next session since I am aware we won't be offered refreshments at the archives. £2

4pm: Our day is over and I wish everyone farewell before I head home. Most freelance days involve a LOT of driving for archaeological walks, different libraries, different sites and group visits along with different places for meetings. So I usually drive home, do my usual routine and finish my day off slowly in the evening. But not today! I catch up on all the work and even sneak in some emails about my next freelance project. I will say, although I don’t want to be a freelancer forever I am amazed that my niche heritage and archaeology work is attracting attention.

5.10pm: I finish up and walk to the bus station and pay £2 for the single trip. The bus is pretty loud and full but we live too far away to realistically walk so the purchase was needed.

5.40pm: Get home and set myself up for my evening routine while chatting with M. After my run, I shower and start making tea. I am nothing if not a creature of habit.

7pm: I use my evening to catch up with friends, bulk messaging people, checking replies and video chat with my bestie while I crochet. I'm learning to be content with the social life I currently have, which is probably a weird thing to say. We lived in York before the pandemic and I had a bunch of friends who I would see weekly for a pint, food or walk around the city. I'm slowly making friends again back in Lancashire but working far away also means new work friends aren't around the corner.

11pm: My refund came through for the software! It pays to be quick and call the centre.

Total: £4
<strong>Day Four </strong><br><br>6.45am: Another early start, help me. I drag myself out of bed and get ready for the day. I put my breakfast in a Tupperware and head out the door to my other museum job. <br><br>9.15am: This museum role is slightly different even though it is for the same company and technically the same role. It has a different type of workload, which I suspect is based on how each museum's manager sees the job and delegates different things for me to oversee. <br><br>11am: We have an adorable event going on at the museum. A local artist group has been invited to come and draw or paint the museum and grounds so I prepare the room for their things and meet them on arrival. The oldest member at 96 makes it up the hill and sets his easel down, I am incredibly impressed! <br><br>1.30pm: After covering staff lunches and checking on the event I head to my lunch break. It is nice to have the staff room to myself and watch a TV show in the half-hour break.<br><br>5.15pm: The museum closes like normal and after good traffic I get home a little earlier than usual. <br><br>6pm: We have leftovers for tea so I get ready to go for my run and decide to actually run around the local park. <br><br>7.20pm: Running is good for you but jeez it is exhausting and tiring! I can’t remember the last time I really pushed myself. I still struggle with pacing myself because of my treadmill running but I know the three-mile run around the block through the park and I typically stop at the same places. Today I kept going as long as I could!<br><br>8.15pm: I head through the door panting and am greeted by M who starts telling me all about his day and how he has 'made tea'. M has also ordered the food shop like we always do for the family and kindly explains I owe £35 for my portion. We split the cost between everyone. <br><br>10pm: I start winding down for bed and packing my bag for my trip tomorrow. I am off to see a friend in Yorkshire and stay over at her apartment. I spend a fair bit of time debating the weather and outfit options. Given our plans to see museums, visit tea shops and generally see the sights I decide on a lot of layers and options. <br><br>11pm: Sleep.<br><br><strong>Total: £35</strong>
Day Four

6.45am: Another early start, help me. I drag myself out of bed and get ready for the day. I put my breakfast in a Tupperware and head out the door to my other museum job.

9.15am: This museum role is slightly different even though it is for the same company and technically the same role. It has a different type of workload, which I suspect is based on how each museum's manager sees the job and delegates different things for me to oversee.

11am: We have an adorable event going on at the museum. A local artist group has been invited to come and draw or paint the museum and grounds so I prepare the room for their things and meet them on arrival. The oldest member at 96 makes it up the hill and sets his easel down, I am incredibly impressed!

1.30pm: After covering staff lunches and checking on the event I head to my lunch break. It is nice to have the staff room to myself and watch a TV show in the half-hour break.

5.15pm: The museum closes like normal and after good traffic I get home a little earlier than usual.

6pm: We have leftovers for tea so I get ready to go for my run and decide to actually run around the local park.

7.20pm: Running is good for you but jeez it is exhausting and tiring! I can’t remember the last time I really pushed myself. I still struggle with pacing myself because of my treadmill running but I know the three-mile run around the block through the park and I typically stop at the same places. Today I kept going as long as I could!

8.15pm: I head through the door panting and am greeted by M who starts telling me all about his day and how he has 'made tea'. M has also ordered the food shop like we always do for the family and kindly explains I owe £35 for my portion. We split the cost between everyone.

10pm: I start winding down for bed and packing my bag for my trip tomorrow. I am off to see a friend in Yorkshire and stay over at her apartment. I spend a fair bit of time debating the weather and outfit options. Given our plans to see museums, visit tea shops and generally see the sights I decide on a lot of layers and options.

11pm: Sleep.

Total: £35
<strong>Day Five </strong><br><br>8.45am: Get up, make a breakfast suitable to eat in the car and pack up. I end up packing several outfits, coats and jackets since I am taking the car and realise I have the luxury of taking as much as I want. <br><br>9.30am: I set off with the sat nav primed with my friend's address and stop en route at the cheapest petrol station at the moment (none). I refill my car with petrol just to be safe and it comes to £41, which is just under half a tank's worth. This is when I realise just how cheap getting the train is. <br><br>9.45am: I am still pretty hungry after my breakfast and sneak a croissant from the supermarket for 80p. I set my podcasts up on queue and head off on my drive. <br><br>12.15pm: I arrive safe and sound at my friend's apartment in a super sweet village just outside Leeds. After a good catch-up we head out for lunch and chat through the day's plans (a historic house, pub and then a reservation for dinner). <br><br>1pm: 'Lunch' is a giant slice of cake and a pot of tea for £5. We get chatting about work drama and compare the museum sector since she works for a different sort of company. After our lunch we head to the historic house, which apparently has a farm.<br> <br>2pm: We reach Temple Newsam, a historic house in beautiful countryside near Leeds. My friend has passes that allow us free entry and we have the best time seeing all the house has to offer. It is so glamorous with dressing up for all ages, lots of Instagrammable places and a great route with enough unique items to make us have a proper look around. The farm is also so sweet and we see piglets that are a few days old! <br><br>5.30pm: We head back, do a quick outfit change and head out to the pub. This pub encourages cash and a digital detox so I withdraw £10 from an ATM. I spend £5 on my gin and we catch up before setting off for our dinner reservation. <br><br>7.30pm: We arrive after a power walk from the pub and meet my friend's housemate and my close friend. We all work in museums so have a lot to discuss. The meal comes to £22 with our two rounds of drinks. We can’t stop laughing as we ask our friend if they want a box to take their food away before the waitress even does (you had to be there). <br><br>10.30pm: We laugh all the way home and get ready to sleep. I realise my friends are both insane and wake up stupidly early every morning so we mutually agree I am on the sofa. I will send an emoji to our group chat when I am up and promise to get up earlier than usual.<br><br><strong>Total:</strong> <strong>£78.80</strong>
Day Five

8.45am: Get up, make a breakfast suitable to eat in the car and pack up. I end up packing several outfits, coats and jackets since I am taking the car and realise I have the luxury of taking as much as I want.

9.30am: I set off with the sat nav primed with my friend's address and stop en route at the cheapest petrol station at the moment (none). I refill my car with petrol just to be safe and it comes to £41, which is just under half a tank's worth. This is when I realise just how cheap getting the train is.

9.45am: I am still pretty hungry after my breakfast and sneak a croissant from the supermarket for 80p. I set my podcasts up on queue and head off on my drive.

12.15pm: I arrive safe and sound at my friend's apartment in a super sweet village just outside Leeds. After a good catch-up we head out for lunch and chat through the day's plans (a historic house, pub and then a reservation for dinner).

1pm: 'Lunch' is a giant slice of cake and a pot of tea for £5. We get chatting about work drama and compare the museum sector since she works for a different sort of company. After our lunch we head to the historic house, which apparently has a farm.

2pm: We reach Temple Newsam, a historic house in beautiful countryside near Leeds. My friend has passes that allow us free entry and we have the best time seeing all the house has to offer. It is so glamorous with dressing up for all ages, lots of Instagrammable places and a great route with enough unique items to make us have a proper look around. The farm is also so sweet and we see piglets that are a few days old!

5.30pm: We head back, do a quick outfit change and head out to the pub. This pub encourages cash and a digital detox so I withdraw £10 from an ATM. I spend £5 on my gin and we catch up before setting off for our dinner reservation.

7.30pm: We arrive after a power walk from the pub and meet my friend's housemate and my close friend. We all work in museums so have a lot to discuss. The meal comes to £22 with our two rounds of drinks. We can’t stop laughing as we ask our friend if they want a box to take their food away before the waitress even does (you had to be there).

10.30pm: We laugh all the way home and get ready to sleep. I realise my friends are both insane and wake up stupidly early every morning so we mutually agree I am on the sofa. I will send an emoji to our group chat when I am up and promise to get up earlier than usual.

Total: £78.80
<strong>Day Six </strong><br><br>8.30am: I wake up squinting my eyes and grab my phone to send a coffee emoji to our group chat. As if by magic both friends instantly appear and I roll my eyes. Who actually likes mornings? <br><br>9am: We eat amazing pancakes with all the trimmings and head into Leeds for the day.<br><br>11am: We arrive in Leeds and head into the docks. We visit the armories and have a really good time at the first talk when we arrive. We make it up a few floors and see the fighting demonstration and after two and a half hours have weapon fatigue and head to the gift shop. <br><br>1.30pm: We head out to wait for the water taxi aka a boat to take us across the river to our lunch spot, £2. The food is great but I am still pretty stuffed from all the eating out and my friend's amazing hosting skills. I have a weird combination of soup and chips with another G&T, which comes to £19. <br><br>3pm: We power walk across town to the newly renovated Thackray Medical Museum. It is very swishy but comes with an equally swishy price tag of £12. The plus side is the ticket lasts a year so at least my friend can bring other people. We walk through the Victorian street, see the new exhibits and the apothecary shop.<br><br>6pm: Get home and our friend has made tea, which is a crazy double cream cheese bacon chicken lasagne thing. I have to take two lactose tablets to combat the dairy intensity but it's amazing and tastes so good (I forget what real cheese tastes like so this is heaven). <br><br>6.30pm: I discover my friend is selling her spare clothes on Vinted and she can’t shift a pair of shoes. We also discover she is the same shoe size as me. I instantly love them and insist on paying her the £3 listed price.<br> <br>7pm: We have a pot of tea and I slowly pack my bag. It has been great and as much as I want to sit down and watch a <em>Star Wars</em> film with them I have a two-hour drive ahead before I can relax on a sofa. <br><br>7.15pm: My friends are so sweet and pack me a Tupperware box of the cookies they made. <br><br>10pm: I arrive home! I realise I am turning into my parents after I get home and instantly take everything out the car. I do another hour of frenzied unpacking, putting my clothes away and preparing for tomorrow. <br><br>10.30pm: M has made me a packed lunch for tomorrow, which makes me smile. I chat with him about my time in Yorkshire over a brew and then head to bed.<br><br><strong>Total: £36</strong>
Day Six

8.30am: I wake up squinting my eyes and grab my phone to send a coffee emoji to our group chat. As if by magic both friends instantly appear and I roll my eyes. Who actually likes mornings?

9am: We eat amazing pancakes with all the trimmings and head into Leeds for the day.

11am: We arrive in Leeds and head into the docks. We visit the armories and have a really good time at the first talk when we arrive. We make it up a few floors and see the fighting demonstration and after two and a half hours have weapon fatigue and head to the gift shop.

1.30pm: We head out to wait for the water taxi aka a boat to take us across the river to our lunch spot, £2. The food is great but I am still pretty stuffed from all the eating out and my friend's amazing hosting skills. I have a weird combination of soup and chips with another G&T, which comes to £19.

3pm: We power walk across town to the newly renovated Thackray Medical Museum. It is very swishy but comes with an equally swishy price tag of £12. The plus side is the ticket lasts a year so at least my friend can bring other people. We walk through the Victorian street, see the new exhibits and the apothecary shop.

6pm: Get home and our friend has made tea, which is a crazy double cream cheese bacon chicken lasagne thing. I have to take two lactose tablets to combat the dairy intensity but it's amazing and tastes so good (I forget what real cheese tastes like so this is heaven).

6.30pm: I discover my friend is selling her spare clothes on Vinted and she can’t shift a pair of shoes. We also discover she is the same shoe size as me. I instantly love them and insist on paying her the £3 listed price.

7pm: We have a pot of tea and I slowly pack my bag. It has been great and as much as I want to sit down and watch a Star Wars film with them I have a two-hour drive ahead before I can relax on a sofa.

7.15pm: My friends are so sweet and pack me a Tupperware box of the cookies they made.

10pm: I arrive home! I realise I am turning into my parents after I get home and instantly take everything out the car. I do another hour of frenzied unpacking, putting my clothes away and preparing for tomorrow.

10.30pm: M has made me a packed lunch for tomorrow, which makes me smile. I chat with him about my time in Yorkshire over a brew and then head to bed.

Total: £36
<strong>Day Seven </strong><br><br>6.45am: Today should be my day off but I signed up for an extra shift at one of the museums because we are short on staff. I really try to make sure I have two days off a week and with my two days away I didn’t feel guilty about signing up for another shift, especially with a weekend pay enhancement. I drag myself out of bed and grab a banana for breakfast. <br><br>8.30am: There is a local market in the village so I get in 'early' and have a snack and a brew.<br><br>12.30pm: I have my lunch after everyone on the rota and sit down to another TV show. My lunch is interrupted with a staff radio call and I come back to cold tea. My packed lunch hits the spot and I head back to check on things.<br> <br>2.30pm: I use the quiet time to check my emails from my time off and start getting ahead on summer events and prep work for the next team training session. It has been a nice day working with the museum staff for a change but I am getting very socially drained. <br><br>6pm: I arrive home at a good time but I'm exhausted. I decide to order from Too Good To Go to reduce my guilt and order from the carvery a few doors down. We get a vegetarian and meat feast carvery, which comes to a whole £5.20. Split between two it is £2.60! The downside is we can only collect it from 8pm so I walk to our corner shop and spend £2.40 on a few snacks to tide me over and get me out the house. <br><br>8.30pm: After tea we wind down with a film. We are rewatching all the <em>Thor</em> films before we catch the new one. <br><br>10pm: Sleep.<br><br><strong>Total: £3</strong>
Day Seven

6.45am: Today should be my day off but I signed up for an extra shift at one of the museums because we are short on staff. I really try to make sure I have two days off a week and with my two days away I didn’t feel guilty about signing up for another shift, especially with a weekend pay enhancement. I drag myself out of bed and grab a banana for breakfast.

8.30am: There is a local market in the village so I get in 'early' and have a snack and a brew.

12.30pm: I have my lunch after everyone on the rota and sit down to another TV show. My lunch is interrupted with a staff radio call and I come back to cold tea. My packed lunch hits the spot and I head back to check on things.

2.30pm: I use the quiet time to check my emails from my time off and start getting ahead on summer events and prep work for the next team training session. It has been a nice day working with the museum staff for a change but I am getting very socially drained.

6pm: I arrive home at a good time but I'm exhausted. I decide to order from Too Good To Go to reduce my guilt and order from the carvery a few doors down. We get a vegetarian and meat feast carvery, which comes to a whole £5.20. Split between two it is £2.60! The downside is we can only collect it from 8pm so I walk to our corner shop and spend £2.40 on a few snacks to tide me over and get me out the house.

8.30pm: After tea we wind down with a film. We are rewatching all the Thor films before we catch the new one.

10pm: Sleep.

Total: £3
<strong>The Breakdown </strong><br><br>Food & Drink: £98.80<br>Entertainment: £12<br>Clothes & Beauty: £3 <br>Home & Health: £3.49 <br>Travel: £43 <br>Other: £0<br><br><strong>Total: £160.29</strong><br><br><strong>Conclusion</strong><br><br>"I was expecting to spend more on my two days away in Leeds but it is still quite shocking to see the grand total. I have a very good habit of not spending money when I am working and it is mostly when I'm tired or on my days off I tend to splurge. I have set budgets for petrol, for spending on my days off and for food so everything was accounted for. Seeing the grand total is surprising for each category and also the fact that food is my biggest expense. In the future I will be extra careful with subscriptions and surprise expenses. But overall I wouldn't change anything. I think I have a healthy relationship with my money and am very intentional for the most part with the things I spend my hard-earned cash on."
The Breakdown

Food & Drink: £98.80
Entertainment: £12
Clothes & Beauty: £3
Home & Health: £3.49
Travel: £43
Other: £0

Total: £160.29

Conclusion

"I was expecting to spend more on my two days away in Leeds but it is still quite shocking to see the grand total. I have a very good habit of not spending money when I am working and it is mostly when I'm tired or on my days off I tend to splurge. I have set budgets for petrol, for spending on my days off and for food so everything was accounted for. Seeing the grand total is surprising for each category and also the fact that food is my biggest expense. In the future I will be extra careful with subscriptions and surprise expenses. But overall I wouldn't change anything. I think I have a healthy relationship with my money and am very intentional for the most part with the things I spend my hard-earned cash on."

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