Molly-Mae reacts to "backlash" she's received after her endometriosis posts

·3-min read
Photo credit: Ricky Vigil M - Getty Images
Photo credit: Ricky Vigil M - Getty Images

Following Molly-Mae Hague's news that she's been diagnosed with endometriosis and is preparing to have surgery, the Love Island star has reacted to "backlash" she's received for talking about her illness.

Opening up in a YouTube video in June, Molly explained that she's preparing to have keyhole surgery to "get rid" of her endometriosis, a condition which is notoriously difficult to diagnose, with symptoms including extremely painful periods, as well as pelvic pain and difficulty becoming pregnant.

Then, in a recent video, Molly got candid with her fans during a Q&A while doing her makeup, and when asked about her endometriosis she said she knows it's not a topic everybody wants to talk about.

"I actually got a lot of backlash for mentioning it in one of my last videos. When I spoke about it I got so much backlash. The amount of tweets and DMs of girls literally being so nasty towards me, saying I’m not educating people about it properly," Molly-Mae recalled.

"Some girl actually DMd me saying I’m trying to start a trend and make it cool to have endometriosis. I literally had to bite my tongue like: 'No, don’t reply, delete, block, move on,'" she added.

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In response to the follower's claim about her endometriosis somehow being 'trendy' Molly went on to talk about the invasive testing she's been going through.

"You know everyone talks about smear [tests] being a massive thing?... A smear to me now is genuinely going to be like going to the local shop to pick up a bottle of water, it’s going to be a walk in the park for me because I’ve had every kind of poke, prod, scan, ultrasound, internal, external – you name it," she said.

"The dignity is gone, it’s never to be seen again, which is fine… I don’t actually care, I’m not that person that finds things like that embarrassing. Obviously I know it’s a little bit undignified spreading [your legs] for a doctor but these things are normal. When I go for things like that I think: 'This doctor has probably seen this 25 times this morning, let alone in their lifetime,'" Molly added.

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Looking to the future, Molly reiterated how she's keen to have surgery to "get rid" of the period pain she's suffering with, which she described as "on the same level as labour."

"I’m just glad I can now get it sorted and have the surgery to hopefully, once and for all, get rid of the period pains that are... I can only describe it as probably on the same level as labour," she said.

"I obviously don’t know what labour feels like but they’re to the point I literally can’t stand up, I’m screaming in pain, no painkiller will make me feel any better, I have to take days and days off work. I feel like I’ve been in a car crash after I’ve been on my period, it’s not normal."

For more information about endometriosis, visit the NHS' website.

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