Marilyn Monroe used this Hamptons windmill home as a hideaway — and now it’s for sale

Amagansett windmill.
Amagansett windmill.

The striking-looking Windmill House in Amagansett is back on the market — for $12.5 million, having jumped from a recent $12 million ask.

The last time this historic Hamptons property hit the market, it asked $8.5 million in 2016.

Beyond its brag-worthy look, this home is where Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller once vacationed in the 1950s — back when the Hamptons was known for its artists like Jackson Pollock in the Springs and writers like John Steinbeck in Sag Harbor.

Arthur Miller and Marilyn Monroe at the Amagansett estate. Getty Images
Arthur Miller and Marilyn Monroe at the Amagansett estate. Getty Images
A charming bedroom is inside the converted windmill. Rise Media/Douglas Elliman
A charming bedroom is inside the converted windmill. Rise Media/Douglas Elliman
The living room, also inside the windmill itself, is octagonal. Rise Media/Douglas Elliman
The living room, also inside the windmill itself, is octagonal. Rise Media/Douglas Elliman
Another bedroom is in an extension that was added on later. Rise Media/Douglas Elliman
Another bedroom is in an extension that was added on later. Rise Media/Douglas Elliman

The cozy spread, at 64 Deep Lane, was once a working mill, as its shingled cedar facade and handsome windmill blades prominently show.

The residence also boasts an addition from the 1950s, which tacked on a bedroom, a kitchen and a bath. That work, we hear, was likely undertaken by a then-owner who was Monroe and Miller’s connection, Faberge Perfumes founder Samuel Rubin.

Long before the A-list set and deep-pocketed renters flocked to the Hamptons for summer stays, the region was replete with farms, with mills grinding grain for livestock. Several of these windmills remain, and they’ve since converted into high-end homes, such as this one.

This top-level space still houses the windmill’s mechanicals — and, sheathed in cedar, can today be a great closet. Rise Media/Douglas Elliman
This top-level space still houses the windmill’s mechanicals — and, sheathed in cedar, can today be a great closet. Rise Media/Douglas Elliman
Pull up a stool in the cozy kitchen. Rise Media/Douglas Elliman
Pull up a stool in the cozy kitchen. Rise Media/Douglas Elliman
Beyond the wow factor of the exterior, there’s also great outdoor space. Rise Media/Douglas Elliman
Beyond the wow factor of the exterior, there’s also great outdoor space. Rise Media/Douglas Elliman

Built in 1830, the 1,300-square-foot residence, which has been newly renovated, takes up three floors.

It comes with just two bedrooms, along with just one bath. Listing images show the stylish interior of the windmill space, with features including wood-heavy ceilings in the top-most level, which still houses the mechanicals for the mill — including a brake for the blades. This can also act as a closet, as it’s fully sheathed in cedar.

As for the bedrooms, the one on the second floor inside the windmill is octagonal, while the main floor of the structure is a living room that bears the same shape.

While the space is small, it sits on 5.45 acres and comes with “opportunities” to create a unique family compound with the addition of a 20,000-square-foot dream house with “distant panoramic water views” on the highest point of Quail Hill, the listing notes — from Douglas Elliman’s Bobby Rosenbaum.

“I stayed there. It is magical,” said Rosenbaum. “You can feel the spirit of Marilyn lurking somewhere nearby,” added Rosenbaum, who recalled meeting the wife of one of Marilyn Monroe’s close photographers at a screening of “Marilyn” in the Hamptons.

“She told me that Marilyn loved it there and never wanted to leave — she was using it as a hideaway. Officially she was staying somewhere else and she and Arthur would come here, in part because it was totally private, and out of sight from the road.”