Lady Gaga: It'll be hard to let go of Patrizia Reggiani

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Lady Gaga will struggle to
Lady Gaga will struggle to

Lady Gaga thinks she'll struggle to "let go" of Patrizia Reggiani.

The chart-topping pop star played the Italian socialite - who was convicted of hiring a hitman to kill her ex-husband, Maurizio Gucci - in 'House of Gucci', and Gaga admits she's finding it tough to move on from her on-screen character.

She explained: "I would say that in terms of letting the character go, I don't know that I'd ever let her go."

Gaga, 35, previously suffered the same experience after playing the part of Ally Maine in 2018's 'A Star Is Born'.

The singer-turned-actress told Sky News: "It took me years to shed Ali from 'A Star Is Born' and I think the same will be true here."

Gaga admitted that playing the role of Patrizia took a toll on her.

She said: "To say that it would be easy to play a murderer would be a lie.

"I don't believe she had the murder gene, but I do believe that she was triggered and pushed so far over the edge that she committed this murder."

Meanwhile, Gaga recently revealed that she left no stone unturned in her preparation for the role, likening her approach to that of an investigative journalist and revealing that it took six months to master Patrizia's accent.

Gaga explained: "A lot of people don't know this, but when she married Mauricio Gucci, his entire family had turned their back on him, so she didn't marry for money. And when he was murdered, also they were divorced. So there was nothing financially at stake for her when all of this took place, which I found fascinating as a woman because I thought, 'Oh well, then it's because she was hurt.' Then it's because it was love.

"So I spent a lot of time ... I spent six months working on the accent and also delving like a journalist into her life and into their lives to see what were the moments that she was hurt, not included, traumatised ... and how then did this make motivation for murder."

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