I keep getting passed over for promotion – should I quit?

Group of businesspeople meeting in a boardroom.
An employee asks whether they should stay at a company that looked over them for a promotion twice.

I’ve now been passed over for promotion twice in the last 18 months, and the last time it was by someone my junior. Is the writing on the wall? Is it time for me to leave?

The glibness in me wants to say “maybe the third time will be the charm!” but that would be making light of a serious question so I won’t do that.

Every work environment and culture is different. Some big companies create strong internal competition for promotions. Each time, it can only go to one individual, but that doesn’t mean the others are not valued.

In both instances, a junior team member received the promotion. Getty Images/iStockphoto
In both instances, a junior team member received the promotion. Getty Images/iStockphoto

Other cultures are different, and getting passed over could mean that the company doesn’t see you at the next level.

You should have a direct, honest conversation with your boss.

Ask why you were overlooked, what you can do to get to the next level, or if that’s not in the cards for you there.

Depending on the feedback, you could see a path to the promotion — or you may feel like it’s time to leave.

A boss is anxious about an employee who hands in projects at the last minute. Getty Images
A boss is anxious about an employee who hands in projects at the last minute. Getty Images

I have someone on my staff who only seems to be able to work under extreme deadline pressure. Despite the fact that he knows projects are due by a certain deadline, he’s always turning in things at the last minute. The end product is always great but the stress as his manager makes me uncomfortable and it’s too risky to manage the workload this way. He doesn’t seem to care. Can I take action?

Yes — but are you sure you want to “take action” against an employee who meets his deadlines, even if last minute, when the end product is great?

“Good help is hard to find” is a saying for a reason. And if he delivers each week, the stress level shouldn’t be high.

Perhaps give him an earlier deadline, to build in buffer time to give you more comfort.

Although, that’s like continually telling someone who is notoriously late fake times — eventually, they work it out and don’t believe you.

Keep trying to work with your employee and coach them to make incremental steps to work differently — it will reduce their stress, too.

Gregory Giangrande has over 25 years of experience as a chief human resources executive. Hear Greg Wed. at 9:35 a.m. on iHeartRadio 710 WOR with Len Berman and Michael Riedel. Email: GoToGreg@NYPost.com. Follow: GoToGreg.com and on Twitter: @GregGiangrande