Jenny Agutter admits Call The Midwife is nearing its end

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Jenny Agutter credit:Bang Showbiz
Jenny Agutter credit:Bang Showbiz

Jenny Agutter has hinted that 'Call The Midwife' is coming to an end. 

The star of the BBC One show - who has played Nonnatus House’s Sister Julienne for over a decade - implied the changes in childbirth practices in the latter half of the 20th century means that the period drama will have to end as historically the need for community midwives in the UK ended. 

In an interview with website AssignmentX.com, the 68-year-old actress said: "I have always taken it year by year. I’ve always felt that if the stories remain good, and imaginative, it’s something I want to do. And they always have. So, I can see myself definitely doing next year, taking it into 12.  

"I think, unlike 'EastEnders', 'Call The Midwife' is something that belongs as a complete piece of just over a decade or so anyway. That whole sense of the midwife in the community changes, and then birth control takes much more effect. So, it will not continue in the same way. You could have a series about the clinics that they started, the maternity homes they started, but not really about the nuns and their involvement." 

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‘The Railway Children’ actress also shared some ideas about how to keep the show historically accurate. 

She suggested: “You could have a series about the clinics that they started, the maternity homes they started, but not really about the nuns and their involvement.” 

The series - which is set in east London - began its story in 1957 when it first debuted in 2012 and it is based on a book by Jennifer Worth, titled ‘Call the Midwife: A True Story of the East End in the 1950s’. 

The latest season to air - it's tenth - took place in the late 60s and featured historical events such as England’s World Cup victory.  

It will be back on our screens next month for the Christmas Special. 

The show - which also stars Helen George, Leonie Elliott, and Laura Main - faced another hiccup earlier this year as the studio they used to film was sold to streaming giant Netflix. However, last month, senior executives at the BBC assured audiences the show was not going anywhere.  

Piers Wenger, the head of BBC Drama said: "That show will be made - we're not going to stop making it just because we don't have access to studio space.”

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