Introducing LeBrand: the Polish label that will convince you to be a minimalist

Ella Alexander
·3-min read
Photo credit: Courtesy
Photo credit: Courtesy

The last 12 months have divided the style set into two camps. There are those who, frustrated by a year of tracksuits and trainers, are desperate to get dressed up in their boldest, most colourful and embellished ensembles, complete with their favourite heels. Then there are those who have used this year to embrace a more fuss-free existence adhering to a ‘less is more’ attitude where simplicity is key. Neither is wrong, but it’s the latter that has led to the rise of LeBrand, a little-known Polish label characterised by minimalism.

Over the past year, LeBrand has become a favourite among women known for their polished and understated approach to style, with fans including Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Géraldine Boublil and Jen Azoulay. It’s the kind of brand that attracts not only models and influencers, but also creative directors, photographers and stylists – smart women with work to do who want uncomplicated timeless clothing that they don’t have to think about. These are decisive, hardworking and considered pieces that don’t shout over the wearer without feeling overly stark or cold.

Photo credit: Courtesy
Photo credit: Courtesy
Photo credit: Courtesy
Photo credit: Courtesy

“LeBrand speaks to someone who looks at fashion with a critical eye,” says Sara King Moura, who joined the company as global PR and incubator consultant last year and is helping to hone its aesthetic. “Our customer is absolutely in love with simplicity, purity, clarity and virtue of the good and well thought design. She isn’t influenced by superficial and senseless trends, and veers towards sophisticated and polished colour palettes that easily embrace an easy, versatile tailoring and layering game.”

LeBrand was first launched in 2014 by Paulina Pyszkiewicz, who was inspired by the stark lines and austerity of 21st century Polish architecture. The designer decided early on to work largely with local family-run producers and to reuse and repurpose any excess materials. Last year saw the label make real waves on the fashion map, attracting stockists in Moda Operandi and Printemps in Paris. Sales rose 30 per cent in the last 12 months, and a number of pieces became so popular they sold out, including the elegant Yena dress and classic white Mill shirt, both of which have been restocked. Both exude the polished yet laid back aesthetic that has become LeBrand’s USP.

Moura believes LeBrand’s rising star status is in part thanks to a simpler approach to living, born of the pandemic. “Minimalism is not necessarily about this very well-known Scandinavian style or aesthetic,” she tells us. “Minimalism has evolved as a concept; it’s become a mindset and a way of living.”

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In terms of fashion, it’s not just about how often or little you shop, she says, but thinking carefully about which pieces are deserving of our appreciation. “This new minimalism is about eliminating unnecessary noise and celebrating the silence that lives among the subtlety of an earthy colour palette and easy proportions,” Moura explains. “Fashion can be a powerful catalyst for change, but it can also be a soothing tool for the human mind – fuss-free and simple clothes can reflect the inner peace a person feels.”

There will always be those who prefer the razzle dazzle of maximalism above all else, but as cases for minimalism go, LeBrand puts forward a compelling argument.

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