GMB's Kate Garraway shares effects of long COVID on husband

·2-min read
Photo credit: James Gourley/ITV/Shutterstock
Photo credit: James Gourley/ITV/Shutterstock

Good Morning Britain host Kate Garraway has talked about the long-terms effects that COVID has had on her husband Derek Draper.

Derek contracted the virus early into the worldwide pandemic, and was placed into intensive care for months. He's been moved back to the family home where he is receiving around the clock care, as the side effects and damage COVID has done to his body are still greatly affecting him.

Speaking to Dr Hilary Jones about the effects of 'Long COVID', such as fatigue, Kate revealed that her husband is only awake for a few hours of each day.

Photo credit: James Gourley/ITV/Shutterstock
Photo credit: James Gourley/ITV/Shutterstock

"Fatigue I used to think was going to bed late and getting up early in the morning," she explained, "but the fatigue that Derek has, and I know he's an extreme case, because he's got multiple organ challenges. Derek is sleeping 20 out of 24 hours a day, he has 10 minute windows [of being awake].

"It's just not feeling tired, he goes white, pale and it's like everything shuts down. You don't want that kind of fatigue, even ruling out the other things people are suffering with long COVID."

Kate previously appeared on The Andrew Marr Show and revealed that Derek has a long road ahead of him before he makes a proper recovery, stating: "There are moments where there's up, you feel you know he's in there. He has a lot of memory.

Photo credit: Can Nguyen/Shutterstock
Photo credit: Can Nguyen/Shutterstock

"But the accessing of it is very limited. He's a long way from the Derek Draper that you know, Andrew, but he's home and he's alive, he's asleep now."

Good Morning Britain airs weekdays from 6am on ITV. Kate Garraway's book The Power of Hope, reflecting on the family's journey, is available now.

The information in this story is accurate as of the publication date. While we are attempting to keep our content as up-to-date as possible, the situation surrounding the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic continues to develop rapidly, so it's possible that some information and recommendations may have changed since publishing. For any concerns and latest advice, visit the World Health Organisation. If you're in the UK, the National Health Service can also provide useful information and support, while US users can contact the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

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