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Glen Matlock doubts there'll be a hologram of late Sex Pistols bandmate Sid Vicious

Glen Matlock admitted there is not a lot of footage of Sid Vicious performing credit:Bang Showbiz
Glen Matlock admitted there is not a lot of footage of Sid Vicious performing credit:Bang Showbiz

Glen Matlock admits the chances of the Sex Pistols creating a show with late band member Sid Vicious as a hologram are slim.

The legendary punk rock group's bassist is seemingly not a fan of shows like ABBA's avatar show 'ABBA Voyage' and much prefers the real thing.

He is quoted by the Daily Mirror newspaper as saying: “There’s nothing better than a band playing with passion, vim and vigour in front of a live audience – in tune, with a couple of beers inside them, or a coffee, going for it.”

He continued: “If they can dig up some 3D imagery of Sid at this stage, that would be an achievement in itself.”

Bassist Sid died of a heroin overdose aged 21 in 1979.

Meanwhile, David Bowie could be the focus of a new ABBA Voyage-style virtual reality show.

The 'Starman' singer died of cancer in 2016 aged 69 but fans could get the chance to experience his iconic showmanship once again as discussions are underway to create a digital avatar of the legendary performer, following in the footsteps of the 'Super Trooper' hitmakers, whose virtual likenesses have been performing in London since last May.

A source told the Sunday Mirror newspaper: “The idea of being able to recreate David’s charisma and electric showmanship for an audience is an intoxicating one, and the prospect of how that might be done is being explored. It’s a very exciting time.”

And Brett Morgen, who directed the 2022 Bowie film 'Moonage Daydream' thinks it would be a very "interesting" plan.

He said: “Voyage was one of the greatest cinematic experiences I have ever seen. Could there be a Bowie one? I think there may be some interesting things happening ahead.”

It was revealed earlier this week that Bowie's 80,000-strong archive - including handwritten lyrics, letters, sheet music, original costumes, fashion, photography, film, music videos, set designs and the 'Heroes' singer's own instruments - will go on display to the public for the very first time in 2025.

And the late pop icon will be immortalised through the creation of The David Bowie Centre for the Study of Performing Arts at V+A East Storehouse, in Stratford’s Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park.