• Make summer sandwiches more exciting with these delicious recipes
    Style
    The Telegraph

    Make summer sandwiches more exciting with these delicious recipes

    It’s mid-afternoon in New York. We’re out of sorts, groggy after our flight, and our stomachs don’t know what time it is. Should we keep going until the evening meal?

  • 10 second trick tells you whether your eggs are past their sell-by date
    Style
    Francesca Specter

    10 second trick tells you whether your eggs are past their sell-by date

    This ten second trick could prevent you from wasting eggs that are still good to eat.

  • Quarter of Brits are drinking plant-based milks, but are the dairy-free alternatives healthier?
    Style
    Francesca Specter

    Quarter of Brits are drinking plant-based milks, but are the dairy-free alternatives healthier?

    Oat, coconut and almond milk alternatives have all grown in availability in the past year, according to a report.

  • Free Pret iced coffee on Friday if you use this password
    Style
    Francesca Specter

    Free Pret iced coffee on Friday if you use this password

    The drinks will be available at Pret stores nationwide between the hours of 10am and 11am tomorrow.

  • London Pride 2019: Rainbow food and charity dishes to celebrate at the capital's restaurants this weekend
    Style
    Evening Standard

    London Pride 2019: Rainbow food and charity dishes to celebrate at the capital's restaurants this weekend

    Flying the Pride flag loud and proud all weekend? You're going to need some sustenance. The Pride parade will be dancing in the streets of central London this Saturday, with celebrations taking on extra significance in the 50th anniversary year of the Stonewall riots in New York. Plenty of restaurants are planning to paint the town rainbow this weekend too: multi-coloured morsels will be served up across London, with the sales of limited edition dishes benefiting a variety of LGBTQ+ charities. From technicolour burgers to glitter milkshakes, these are the dishes doing their bit during London's Pride celebrations. Mother Clucker Mother Clucker’s “Deep Pride” burger fills rainbow brioche from Bethnal Green's Rinkoff Bakery with its signature fried chicken thigh. The restaurant will be taking part in the Pride festivities at Flat Iron Square, where £1.50 from the sale of each limited edition burger will be donated to transgender children’s charity Mermaids. £12, Flat Iron Square, SE1, motherclucker.co.uk Chotto Matte This rainbow sashimi dish tops a selection of raw fish (tuna, salmon, yellowtail and seabass) with kantai filo and gold leaf, commemorating 50 years since Stonewall. £1 from each dish sold goes towards the Stonewall charity. £11, 11-13 Frith Street, W1, chotto-matte.com BaoCelebrating Taiwan’s recent legalisation of same-sex marriage, all the proceeds of Bao's new rainbow dessert go to the Albert Kennedy Trust. The twin-shaped steamed bun is dyed with rainbow colours and comes filled with banana and dark chocolate ice cream. £7.50, 31 Windmill Street, W1, baolondon.com Pastaio The Pride Cannoli Sundae at Soho Italian Pastaio comes stuffed with pistachio ice cream, cannoli pastry pieces and cannoli ricotta – it's also served this weekend with both a rainbow spoon and festive sparkler. £5 from every sale helps the London LGBTQ+ Community Centre.£8, 19 Ganton Street, W1, pastaio.london Shake ShackRainbow glitter sprinkles top Shake Shack’s limited edition Pride Shake. The shake is described as "cake batter" flavoured, and £1 from each sale will be given to the Mosaic LGBT Youth Centre. £5.25, various locations, shakeshack.co.uk

  • Wash your tea towel daily to avoid food poisoning
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Wash your tea towel daily to avoid food poisoning

    Dirty tea towels can harbour bacteria that make you ill.

  • Scientists confirm the best (and worst) thing to drink after a curry
    Style
    Francesca Specter

    Scientists confirm the best (and worst) thing to drink after a curry

    Mouth on fire? This is what you need.

  • These 9 kitchen cupboard items make you middle class, apparently
    Style
    Cosmo

    These 9 kitchen cupboard items make you middle class, apparently

    An etiquette expert has had his say

  • What does the introduction of 'Natasha's law' mean for food allergy sufferers?
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    What does the introduction of 'Natasha's law' mean for food allergy sufferers?

    The new legislation is set to be introduced by 2021.

  • Keeping your house too clean is NOT bad for your health, experts reveal
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    Marie Claire Dorking

    Keeping your house too clean is NOT bad for your health, experts reveal

    *googles cleaning hacks*

  • We Tried Kellogg's White Chocolate Coco Pops – Here's What We Thought
    Style
    HuffPost UK

    We Tried Kellogg's White Chocolate Coco Pops – Here's What We Thought

    Kellogg's has given everyone's favourite breakfast-turned-evening-snack amakeover - Coco Pops are now available in white chocolate flavour

  • 8 best portable BBQs that will see you through festivals, camping holidays and garden gatherings
    Style
    The Independent

    8 best portable BBQs that will see you through festivals, camping holidays and garden gatherings

    Summer is here, and with it the grand old British tradition of barbecuing in the pouring rain. But don’t let the weather dissuade you: whether you’re heading to a festival, the beach, or just the garden, new lightweight materials and bluetooth-controlled grills mean that it’s easier than ever to turn out perfectly chargrilled bangers and burgers on the go.We tested these barbecues across a series of rain-soaked and very occasionally sunny outdoor dinners, using them for everything from traditional meat-feasts to vegan seitan and jackfruit burgers, and we were really impressed with what you can do with even the simplest kettle barbecue.The first thing we looked for was portability: some of the gourmet barbecues in this roundup pushed the limit of what we could comfortably carry from the car or kitchen, but were so worth it that we included them anyway (with a weight warning).Others were incredibly light and easy to carry, but wouldn’t do a great job of slow-cooking a rack of ribs. If you plan to use your barbecue at home and on the occasional caravan or car camping trip, go for a heavier, more durable option. If you just want something to grill a few sausages on during a camping weekend, go light – particularly if you’ll be packing in and out.Portability aside, the most important consideration is what you plan to cook. If it’s simple burgers and bangers, a simple grill will do the trick. If it’s slow-cooked, pulled-pork and gourmet grilling you have in mind, go for a kettle-style barbecue. If you’re going to be cooking lighter food – grilled vegetables and skewers for example – something small and clean is best. What you cook on is also important: kettle barbecues and open grills will give you that classic, charcoal taste; electric and gas grills will cook faster and more precisely. When testing, we always bore in mind that a range of people would end up using the barbecue – from meat lovers to vegans – so we looked for grills with plenty of space to keep meat and veg apart, and that were easy and quick to clean. All these barbecues will cook for 2-3 people at a time.You can trust our independent reviews. We may earn commission from some of the retailers, but we never allow this to influence selections, which are formed from real-world and expert advice. This revenue helps us to fund journalism across The Independent. Easy Camp adventure grill: £34.99, Easy CampA really lovely little grill for a fantastic price, Easy Camp’s adventure grill is perfect for fuss-free family camping or beach barbecues. It manages to pack in a lot of the features of much more expensive grills – like an adjustable air vent that felt durable and sensitive, a good deep barrel for layering charcoal, and a sturdy-feeling lid handle – for less than half the price. Some of the features – the foldable legs and the clips, for example – didn’t feel quite as sturdy as on more expensive grills, but they would more than do the trick for a weekend adventure or an impromptu garden grill. At just under 2.5kg, it’s also impressively lightweight.Buy now Outwell darby grill: £136.99, Outwell​A brilliantly simple, innovative electric grill, the darby is ideal if you’re planning on cooking anywhere with an electric hook-up like a campsite or your garden. Because it’s electric it’s much easier to control the temperature, and the detachable windscreen/lid does a really good job of protecting your food from gusts. Because the grill is non-stick it’s also ideal for slightly healthier cooking, or if you’re doing something a bit more technical. The drain channels are designed to carry fat away from the meat, but we found they were just as good at coping with excess marinades and basting juices. The little spice rack in the stand is a really clever idea.Buy now Robens wayne grill: £43.99, Robens​Insanely light and tiny when packed up, the wayne grill is a simple solution for cooking at festivals, bikepacking or even hiking trips. Weighing in at just over 2.5kg, it folds up quickly and intuitively and slots inside the tiny carry case, included. Don’t expect any fuss: fill the base with charcoal or wood, light, cover with the grill, and cook. Why overcomplicate things? We found that the shape of the base caused heat to really concentrate in the middle with the outside staying quite cool, but even though it is a smaller grill, you can comfortably cook a couple of burgers and some sausages at the same time.Buy now Big Green Egg mininax: £650, John Lewis & PartnersThe ultimate outdoor chef’s toy, the smallest Big Green Egg available really pushes the limit of what you could sensibly consider portable, weighing in at a mighty 40kg. This means it’s portable from, say, the car or caravan to a few metres away from the car or caravan. But it also really pushes the limit of what you can cook outside: beloved of professional chefs, and supposedly based on technology as ancient as the Chinese Qin Dynasty, the egg is a kamado-style cooker (a pot) rather than a kettle barbecue. Run off wood, it grills beautifully, but comes into its own for a long cook (like pulled pork) or for smoking if you layer the (included) ceramic inset over the coals to redirect heat around the walls. Price-wise it’s as eye-watering as barbecue smoke, but it will totally redefine what you think of as barbecue cooking.Buy now Weber smokey joe premium charcoal barbecue: £74.99, WeberA real American classic, from the Chicago company that claims to have invented the kettle barbecue in the first place, the smokey joe is a nomadic grillhead’s dream. Charcoal-fuelled, its lockable lid seals in smoke for slow cooking or seasoning, and the plated grill is easy to remove and clean between cooks. But best of all is the portability: it looks tiny but can easily feed 3-4 people, it’s deceptively light, and the locking lid and reinforced handle means you can pick it up and move it even when it’s still warm. It feels really sturdy and durable, and comes from one of the best brands in barbecuing.Buy now Biolite firepit: £219.95, BioliteOur tester already loved BioLite, an eco-friendly company known for its innovative twig-burning camping stoves and portable solar panels, so was really excited to try the amazing firepit. We’re happy to report that it’s an absolute gamechanger: as it burns logs or charcoal, the integrated fan that you control via bluetooth from your phone directs air over 51 jets to create a roaring, smoke-free, searing hot fire in minutes. The walls are made of see-through mesh, creating a “floating fire” effect that really is dramatic.Admittedly, It’s better for hibachi-style cooking with sticks and kebabs than burgers: the rectangular grill that slips over the top doesn’t give you acres of space. But for a party or trip to the beach, it’s perfect: the fan is powered by a detachable battery that charges via micro USB, will charge your devices in a pinch, and will charge itself using solar power if you use the solar carry cover (sold seperately).Buy now Primus kuchoma stove: £195, Cotswold OutdoorsPrimus’ range of sleek, minimalist camping stoves are some of the most stylish on the market, and the kuchoma is no different. Powered by gas cartridges, like the type you’d use for a small camping stove, it’s the closest portable barbecuing can get to cooking on a proper stove, with fine-tunable heat and – thanks to the design – no wind-induced flare-ups. The non-stick grill plate is really easy to clean and dishwasher friendly, and the whole thing closes up into a little briefcase-sized compact rectangle that’s easy to carry and supremely easy to stash in the boot of your car. You may not get the authentic charcoal-smoked flavour you’d get cooking on coals, but you will get some perfectly-seared steaks.Buy now Cobb premier air: £145, CobbThere is literally nothing you can’t do with a Cobb cooker, essentially a charcoal fire inside a big metal dome with enough adjustable vents to suit even the most adventurous outdoor chef. It’s a simple enough design – a fire basket inside a base, with a round grill on top and a domed lid – but it’s amazing what you can do with it. Our tester roasted vegetables and baked bread, but that’s only the beginning: Cobb says it will also cook pizzas and smoke meat, and stir fry or fry if you bring a pan along. The barbecue kit (available separately) transforms it into an open grill if you want a proper charcoal, smokey flavour. For all that, it packs up small and is surprisingly light.Buy now The verdict: Portable barbecuesWe loved the humble, unpretentious Easy Camp adventure grill: light and easy to carry, it did everything you expect of a barbecue (cook things outside) for a third of the price of fancier models. The Big Green Egg is the best pick if you’re hoping to win a Michelin star, and the BioLite was definitely the most innovative barbecue we’ve ever seen.

  • Falafel: Where does the chickpea treat come from?
    Style
    The Independent

    Falafel: Where does the chickpea treat come from?

    Falafel is the crispy street food staple enjoyed by millions around the globe – and it’s being honoured on Tuesday with its very own Google Doodle.More than just a vegetarian lunchtime snack, the humble falafel defies dietary requirements because it's loved by meat-eaters and vegans alike thanks to its flavourful chickpea filling. It’s versatile too, and can be consumed in anything from a hummus-filled pitta bread wrap to a fresh and zesty salad.Recipes vary, but the traditional falafel is made by blending chickpeas with herbs and spices, rolling the mixture into small balls and deep frying them. It sounds like a simple process. But the falafel’s origins are slightly more contentious.While several regions claim the delicacy as their own, it’s almost impossible to trace who exactly invented it, as variations have been eaten around the world for centuries.It’s traditionally viewed as a Middle Eastern dish and is a common sight in restaurants and at market stalls across the Levant – Israel even has its own song to homage its love of falafel, titled “And we have falafel”.The majority of the world’s chickpeas are produced in India, but falafel isn’t as much of a staple there as it is in, say, Egypt, where falafel is made using fava beans and is known as “ta’amiya”.It’s thought that the first people to start eating falafel in pita bread were Yemeni Jews, but the dish has surged in popularity across the world along with the rise of vegetarianism. In North America, falafel could only be found in specific Arabic or Jewish neighbourhoods and eateries up until around 1970. Now, it’s widely available across the US in mainstream restaurants and is topped with everything from Yemeni hot sauce to Iraqi fried aubergine.Falafel also appeals to health-conscious diners thanks to its high protein and complex carbohydrate content.In 2012, the world’s largest falafel was created in a kitchen at the Landmark Hotel in Amman, Jordan. It weighed 74.8 kilograms (164.8 pounds) and had a height of 152 centimetres (59.8 inches). It took 25 minutes to fry.

  • New hack for peeling garlic is lighting up the Internet
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    New hack for peeling garlic is lighting up the Internet

    Minds blown.

  • Man's tweet about expensive trip to a London Cafe goes viral for the best reason
    Style
    Caroline Allen

    Man's tweet about expensive trip to a London Cafe goes viral for the best reason

    On closer inspection this is a different type of story.