FKA twigs proud she was able to continue working amid Shia LaBeouf crisis

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FKA twigs felt proud she was able to continue working despite the fall out from her relationship with Shia LaBeouf credit:Bang Showbiz
FKA twigs felt proud she was able to continue working despite the fall out from her relationship with Shia LaBeouf credit:Bang Showbiz

FKA twigs felt proud she was able to continue working as she dealt with the fall-out from her doomed relationship with actor Shia LaBeouf.

The 'cellophane' hitmaker accused the 'Transformers' actor of sexual battery, assault, and infliction of emotional distress during the course of their brief relationship in 2019 and filed a lawsuit against him in December that year - just a month after the release of her second album 'Magdalene'.

She has now told GQ she feels a sense of achievement that she was able to keep her life together despite all the drama, saying: “One of the greatest achievements of the whole of my life was keeping my shit together. It was one of the things I’m most proud of, that I was able to go on tour and do interviews and stay graceful and keep that calmness … I look at that as a testament to my upbringing and a testament to how much I love my art and a testament to how much I want to show up for people that bought tickets to my gig, because sometimes it was so difficult."

The singer went on to explain she went public with her allegations against her ex because she was convinced telling her story would help her heal and aid others who might be in a similar position.

She added: "I just didn’t want anyone else to get hurt, and that trumped any way that I felt about what people may think about me now, positively or negatively."

She previously opened up about the relationship with LaBeouf in an interview with The Face magazine last year, explaining: "I felt like I was holding on to somebody else’s dysfunction. And now I feel like I’ve given it back to him. It’s his to hold and rightly so. He can hold it because it’s not mine ... You know, it’s important in this day and age that everybody’s able to be accountable for their actions. And I don’t mean in an 'outrage culture' kind of way, because I’m not really here for that either. I mean in a real, genuine, deep place that, thank GOODNESS, we are finally in, where women don’t have to be quiet about that sort of thing anymore."

The July/ August issue of British GQ is available via digital download and on newsstands on 28th June.

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