First lesson read at Queen Elizabeth's funeral

·2-min read
Baroness Scotland delivered the first lesson at Queen Elizabeth's funeral credit:Bang Showbiz
Baroness Scotland delivered the first lesson at Queen Elizabeth's funeral credit:Bang Showbiz

The Rt Hon Patricia Scotland read the first lesson at Queen Elizabeth's funeral on Monday (19.09.22).

The Commonwealth secretary-general had the honour of addressing assembled guests at Westminster Abbey by reading a passage from the bible, 1 Corinthians 15, which stresses the importance of the resurrection in the Christian faith and says death will be the final enemy to be defeated by Christ.

She read: "Now is Christ risen from the dead, and become the firstfruits of them that slept. For since by man came death, by man came also the resurrection of the dead. For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive.

"But every man in his own order: Christ the firstfruits; afterward they that are Christ’s at his coming. Then cometh the end, when he shall have delivered up the kingdom to God, even the Father; when he shall have put down all rule and all authority and power. For he must reign, till he hath put all enemies under his feet. The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death.

"For this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality.

"So when this corruptible shall have put on incorruption, and this mortal shall have put on immortality, then shall be brought to pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory. O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory? The sting of death is sin; and the strength of sin is the law.

"But thanks be to God, which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ. Therefore, my beloved brethren, be ye steadfast, unmoveable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, forasmuch as ye know that your labour is not in vain in the Lord."

After her address, the choir then sang a psalm which had been composed especially for the service by Judith Weir, the queen's Master of Music.

Its words were: "Like as the hart desireth the water-brooks: so longeth my soul after thee, O God. My soul is athirst for God, yea, even for the living God: when shall I come to appear before the presence of God?

"My tears have been my meat day and night: while they daily say unto me, Where is now thy God?

"Now when I think thereupon, I pour out my heart by myself: for I went with the multitude, and brought them forth into the house of God;

"In the voice of praise and thanksgiving: among such as keep holy-day. Why art thou so full of heaviness, O my soul: and why art thou so disquieted within me?

"Put thy trust in God: for I will yet give him thanks for the help of his countenance."