A Doctor Reacts to Conor McGregor’s Broken Leg at UFC 264

·2-min read
Photo credit: Stacy Revere - Getty Images
Photo credit: Stacy Revere - Getty Images

Controversial MMA fighter Conor McGregor was beaten again by Dustin Poirier at UFC 264. Following a knockout defeat back in January, McGregor's latest rematch against Poirier ended in the first round when doctors put a stop to the fight, after McGregor broke his leg.

"This is not over," McGregor told reporters as he was being escorted out of the octagon strapped to a stretcher. "If I have to take it outside, let's take it outside."

In a new video on his YouTube channel, Dr. Brian Sutterer, an expert in physical medicine and rehabilitation, provides his professional opinion on McGregor's injury, reviewing fight footage to pinpoint exactly when the break occurred, as well as offering some insight on likely methods of treatment, and how this will affect McGregor's fighting career.

"No doubt about it, this was a really unusual, flukey type of injury," he says. "McGregor's ankle actually looked like it fractured before the main fracture occurred... McGregor kind of plants on that left foot as he's getting ready to push off, and you can see that slight little tweak, you can see the outer portion of his ankle shift outward. Honestly, I think this is when the break actually was first initiated, before he stepped on it, inverting the ankle, causing that more complete injury."

What happened, essentially, was that McGregor rolled his ankle, Sutterer explains, going into a serious amount of inversion due to a lack of stability as a result of his prior step. "It's a common mechanism for a lateral ankle sprain that we see in sports all the time," he continues, "but now there's no stability there... all this torsional twisting load gets transferred up through his tibia, into the fibula, making this break much more severe."

The fibula likely fractured first, followed by the tibia. Sutterer also speculates that there may have been some pre-existing trauma or weakness in McGregor's leg, which may have contributed to the severity of the injury.

"What we have to remember about bones is that they're really strong when you squeeze them and put them into compression, but when you start twisting bones, they're not nearly as strong," he says.

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