David Beckham 'speaks' nine different languages in malaria awareness video

Francesca Specter
Yahoo Style UK deputy editor

David Beckham has spoken out about malaria – appearing to share his message in an impressive nine different languages.

The 43-year-old sportsman has partnered with the Malaria No More launch campaign to spread awareness about the potentially fatal disease, which claimed 435,000 lives in 2017.

He is a founding member of the Malaria No More UK Leadership Council.

The campaign’s promotion video features Beckham talking to the camera about the worldwide impact of malaria.

READ MORE: David Beckham sports eyeshadow on magazine cover

With the help of artificial intelligence “deepfake” voice synthesis technology, he appears to speak in nine different languages.

The technology makes Beckham appear multilingual, beginning his 55-second video message in English then transitioning to eight other languages: Spanish, Kinyarwanda, Arabic, French, Hindi, Mandarin, Kiswahili and Yoruba.

David Beckham is working with the Malaria Must Die campaign. [Photo: PA Images]

Each language represents a part of the world which has been affected by malaria.

Beckham ends the film in English, saying: “Speak up and say ‘malaria must die’. One voice can be powerful, but all of our voices together? Then they will have to listen.”

He told Press Association: “I have been working with Malaria No More UK for over 10 years and to be a part of this campaign and to help share some of the real stories behind malaria is really important to me.”

READ MORE: Missing eyelids with your SPF could increase skin cancer risk

Dr Elvis Eze, whose voice features speaking Yoruba, a language spoken in Nigeria, said: “My life changed when I worked at a hospital in Lagos, Nigeria, and I saw the intolerable toll of malaria.

“It doesn’t have to be this way. I now work for the NHS in the UK and have seen how this is a global challenge.”

What is malaria?

Malaria is a tropical disease which is spread by mosquitoes. It can be caused by a single bite.

It is potentially fatal if it is not diagnosed early or is left untreated, according to the NHS.

Malaria symptoms usually appear between 7 and 18 days after infection – but can take up to a year to appear. They include a high temperature (38 degrees Celsius and above), vomiting, muscle pains and diarrhoea.

If you develop these symptoms after anything from weeks to a year from when you returning from travelling abroad, you should seek medical help.

Think you are suffering from malaria? Call NHS 111 or contact them online.