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Daniel Craig in planning row over extension to Grade-II listed London home

Under the plans, the couple want to demolish and build a rear extension
Under the plans, the couple want to demolish and build a rear extension - Getty Images North America

James Bond star Daniel Craig and his actress wife Rachel Weisz are locked in a row with local residents over building a new extension at their north London home.

The couple, who live in a £3.2m five-bedroom property in leafy Primrose Hill, lodged a planning application to Camden Council to make renovations to their home in September.

Under the plans, the couple want to build a rear extension after knocking down a ‘poorly-constructed 20th century’ conservatory.

The couple also want to split up the ground floor double reception room into two, move the kitchen and replace the first floor rear window which opens out onto a balcony at their five-bedroom home.

A group of locals have lodged objections to the plans claiming they would not fit in with the style of their Victorian terraced home, which dates back to 1840, is Grade II listed and sits in a conservation area.

Outlining the plans, Craig and Weisz’s planning agent wrote in planning documents: “The proposed new extension would replace an existing late 20th century conservatory which is poorly constructed, inefficient (it is very cold in the winter and it overheats in the summer), and out of keeping with the original building.

“The enlarged extension allows the kitchen (the busiest room in the house) to be relocated to the rear of the property giving it direct contact with the garden and much improved natural light.”

Actors, Daniel Craig (R) and Rachel Weisz (L) are seen in the Royal Box during the Men's Singles Final between Novak Djokovic of Serbia and Carlos Alcaraz of Spain
Actors, Daniel Craig and Rachel Weisz are seen in the Royal Box during the Men's Singles Final between Novak Djokovic of Serbia and Carlos Alcaraz of Spain - Getty Images Europe

They added: “Internally the spine wall between the ground floor reception rooms would be healed and the existing double doors from the entrance hall separated and re-hung as single doors into the respective reception rooms.

“So the most important rooms in the house would be reinstated to their original form. On the ground floor closet wing the existing study would be subdivided to allow the introduction of a guest WC, providing a much needed facility serving the principle rooms of the house.

“The second floor closet wing rear window is, currently, a modern side hung casement. It is proposed to replace this with a French door style window with narrower frames and glazing bars. The sill to this window would be lowered by approximately 300mm.”

The agent stressed the plans would be “positive” and “improve the balance of the main living areas of the house”.

Richard Simpson, on behalf of Camden Council’s Primrose Hill Conservation Area Committee, has lodged an objection to the plans on two grounds.

Mr Simpson, who was Camden Council’s Heritage and Design Champion from 2008 to 2018, said the new extension which would replace the conservatory “would not be in harmony with the original form of the house”.

He also said the committee consisting of a group of residents which advise Camden Council on planning applications had concerns about replacing the first floor window because of the removal of marginal glazing, a type of historic window pattern from the Victorian era. Mr Simpson said the marginal glazing was “a characteristic of the windows in houses of this date” in the local area.

A decision on the planning application is due to be made later this month.

Mr Craig, 55, and Ms Weisz, 53, bought the north London property in 2008 and were previously at the centre of a row with their neighbours over a 50ft-tall plane tree in their garden in 2017.

A neighbour of the couple applied to fell the tree claiming its roots were damaging their home prompting the stars to submit a counter application offering to trim it instead.

Other residents criticised the suggestion to chop it down, claiming that to remove it would be “unnecessary and upsetting”.

However, it was saved from the chop after Camden Council issued a Tree Protection Order for the plane tree saying it contributed to the character of the area.

Craig’s represenative has been approached for comment by The Telegraph.

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