Daily exercise and nutrition goals: What should I be aiming for?

·2-min read
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Eating better and moving more is something many of us aspire to.

And when it comes to diet, nutrition, and fitness levels, it goes deeper than just aesthetics - it's our internal health that matters.

That's why the U.K. government publishes guidelines all adults should follow in regard to what they eat and how much they move. Read on for a round-up of the current advice.

Exercise

Being active is one of the best things we can do for our health, with exercise proven to lower the risk of some cancers, heart disease, stroke, depression, dementia, and even early death.

Adults aged 19-64, should be aiming to do some type of physical activity every day. National Health Service (NHS) experts recommend this age group do at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity a week or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity activity a week.

Those aged 65+ should still be aiming for 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity a week or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity activity if you are already active, or a combination of both.

Diet

Up your daily intake of fruit and vegetables to at least five a day, with 80 grams of fresh, canned or frozen fruit and vegetables counting as a single portion.

Remember that only one portion of the same fruit or veg counts and you can't double up - each portion has to be of different food.

As for calories, men and women have different allowances: the ideal daily calorie intake is 2,000 calories a day for women and 2,500 for men.

But maximum sugar intake is the same - all adults should have no more than 30 grams of free sugars a day, which is roughly the equivalent of seven sugar cubes.

The same is true for salt, and adults shouldn't exceed six grams of salt daily.

Fat varies again: men should not eat more than 30 grams of saturated fat a day, whereas women should not eat more than 20 grams of saturated fat a day.