Cary Joji Fukunaga was careful with special effects on No Time To Die

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  • Cary Joji Fukunaga
    American filmmaker
Cary Joji Fukunaga was careful with special effects on 'No Time To Die' credit:Bang Showbiz
Cary Joji Fukunaga was careful with special effects on 'No Time To Die' credit:Bang Showbiz

Cary Joji Fukunaga was wary about using too many special effects on 'No Time To Die'.

The 44-year-old director helmed the recent James Bond movie – which saw Daniel Craig make his final appearance as the legendary spy – and admits that he didn't want to become reliant on effects as it would take from the authenticity of the long-running franchise.

Asked about his approach to special effects, Cary told Variety: "When I first started making movies I tried to stay away from it entirely. As I've progressed through my projects, I have come to know the moments when we can do visual effects and have it be seamless because the last thing you want is for a sequence to feel like it's coming from a different kind of film.

"In a Bond film, where stunts are being done for real, where so much of it is tangible and on-screen, you're much more vulnerable to VFX that somehow undermine that sense of reality that you're trying to create. So you have to be much more, judicious in the use of it."

Cary also recalled feeling a "shiver down his spine" when her first heard the theme song for the film – a track performed by Billie Eilish that she penned with her brother Finneas O'Connell.

The 'Beasts of No Nation' director explained: "Barbara (Broccoli) had the song first, and she put her phone against her ear. It was a rough demo and I remember a distinct shiver down my spine hearing it. It was brilliant and amazing.

"It's a bold choice, but inside there's a lot of Bond heritage and DNA. Finneas, in terms of music theory, is versed in it, and despite how young he is, the melody is constructed in a very John Barry way with a lot of nods there to classic Bond. So, it's a throwback to the earlier style of Bond songs and music."

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