5 sustainable swaps to make in your kitchen for under $20

Ellie Conley
·3-min read

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Out of all the rooms in your home, you probably produce the most waste in the kitchen. Think about it: Between paper towels, food wrappers, forgotten leftovers, foil and other food wraps — you throw a lot out. But don’t worry, you’re not doomed. You can change! These sustainable swaps are a good starting point — and all cost under $20.

Plus, another great perk of using more sustainable items in your kitchen — you know, besides helping save the planet — is that they can actually save you a lot money. Instead of having to buy new stuff to replace the things you constantly throw out, these sustainable swaps are all reusable. You could go months (or hopefully longer) without having to buy something new.

Shop these five easy sustainable swaps you can make in your kitchen ASAP to reduce waste and save money.

1. Bee’s Wrap, Set Of 3, $18 

Credit: Amazon
Credit: Amazon

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Use instead of: Plastic wrap

“Beeswrap” is a natural alternative to plastic wrap. The wrap is made of cotton, sustainably-harvested beeswax, jojoba oil and tree resin — and it’s totally reusable. It holds its shape when it’s cool, so you can seal food in reusable bowls, wrap up a sandwich or cover produce that’s already been cut.

2. Unpaper Towels, Set Of 10, $19.95

Credit: Williams Sonoma
Credit: Williams Sonoma

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Use instead of: Paper Towels

These reusable waffle-weave cotton towels can be used for drying dishes, wiping up messes, cleaning the counters and more. Use them like a real paper towel. When you’re done, throw them in the washing machine.

3. Dropps Detergent Pods Subscription, $18.75

Credit: Dropps
Credit: Dropps

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Use instead of: Dishsoap

Dropps dishwashing pods use natural minerals to clean dishes — no pre-wash required. Plus, they smell like lemons. The pods come in compostable packaging and the brand partners with 3Degrees for 100% carbon neutral shipping. Sign up for a subscription and get 64 Dropps a month for less than $20.

4. Reusable Coffee Filters for Keurig, $7.18 (Orig. $19.95)

Credit: Amazon
Credit: Amazon

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Use instead of: K-Cups

If you have a Keurig, you know it’s great. But what’s not great? Throwing away plastic K-cups. Use these reusable coffee filters instead and fill them with your own ground coffee. When you’re done brewing your cup of joe, you can toss the coffee grounds and wash the filter to use it again. Not only is it more eco-friendly, but it’s less expensive too.

5. ALINK Glass Straws, Pack Of 8, $7.98

Credit: Amazon
Credit: Amazon

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 Use instead of: Plastic straws

When you think of straw alternatives, you probably think of the soggy paper ones or the really cold stainless steel ones. But glass straws are definitely the superior alternative. They look classy, you can see that they’re actually clean and they won’t change the taste of your drink. This pack includes eight straws — four bent straws and four straight straws — and two cleaning brushes.

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