Blue Badge shakeup could improve travel for those with ‘invisible disabilities’

·1-min read
PLEASE NOTE THAT SOME DETAILS HAVE BEEN BLURRED BY THE PA PICTURE DESK.  A disabled parking badge is displayed at a Sainsburys store in London.
PLEASE NOTE THAT SOME DETAILS HAVE BEEN BLURRED BY THE PA PICTURE DESK. A disabled parking badge is displayed at a Sainsburys store in London.

People with conditions such as dementia or autism may soon have greater access to Blue Badges, according to plans from Transport Minister Jesse Norman. The proposed changes would see those with less obvious disabilities, including mental conditions, given greater access to the badges in order to improve their mobility.

"Blue Badges give people with disabilities the freedom to get jobs, see friends or go to the shops with as much ease as possible," Norman said. "We want to try to extend this to people with invisible disabilities, so they can enjoy the freedom to get out and about, where and when they want."

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