Sacked! People who left their job in style

Sarah Coles
·2-min read
BHJ1EH Depressed fired businessman carrying his belongingsbusinessman, fired, business, man, concept, jobless
BHJ1EH Depressed fired businessman carrying his belongingsbusinessman, fired, business, man, concept, jobless



Michael Gove, George Osborne, and Nicky Morgan: they all know how it feels to lose a job. And while they continue in gainful employment as less high-profile MPs, they must have faced the temptation that everyone has experienced when shown the door - to tell whoever has delivered the news, exactly what they think of them.

Politicians by their very nature, are likely to keep a lid on their reaction, and keep an eye on their long-term position. However, there have been several high profile examples over the years of people who left their jobs - and decided to take a more dramatic approach.

We reported last summer on the intern who wrote a note near the bottom of a post-it note pad on his boss' desk, designed to be found after he had left. It read: "By the time you read this, I'll be long gone from this s***hole. I hope you enjoyed bossing me around. I bet you felt real good about yourself. Well, I wonder how you feel now knowing I spat in your coffee every day."

One clever twist on the theme of creative resignations was back in 2013, when a man who had spent four years working for the Border Agency at Stansted decided to resign to set up a cake-making business. He iced his resignation onto a cake, and told bosses that if they like it, they should place an order.

Then there was the game developer who created his own version of Super Mario, with "I Quit!" appearing whenever Mario grabbed a mushroom. He then sent the game around the office.

Those in top positions, meanwhile, sometimes feel they have a duty to speak out on departure. Goldman Sachs executive director Greg Smith, wrote an article in the New York Times in 2012 on his way out of the door. He wrote: "The corporate culture at Goldman Sachs has been transformed and deteriorated to the point where it became rotten to the core. Clients are viewed as mere 'muppets' who can be fleeced through the investment bank's rapacious greed."

And, of course, many departing members of the shadow cabinet recently have been fairly blunt with the wording of their resignation letters. Heidi Alexander wrote: "As much as I respect you as a man of principle, I do not believe you have the capacity to shape the answers our country is demanding", while Ian Murray said: "I have always expressed my thoughts directly to you as I think it is important to be honest and open with each other. However, I do not feel this has been reciprocated. I also feel the way some colleagues have been treated has been unfortunate." And Seema Malhotra said: "I believe that we need to recognise that we do not currently look like a Government in waiting."

But what do you think? Is it ever worth letting fly when you leave a job? Let us know in the comments.



            Labour exodus: The list of MPs who have left Corbyn's shadow cabinet
Labour exodus: The list of MPs who have left Corbyn's shadow cabinet